ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
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24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 24 million Americans had diabetes in 2007, an increase of more than 3 million over two years, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday.

In addition, another 57 million Americans had pre-diabetes, which puts people at increased risk for diabetes.

There was some good news. Over two years, the proportion of people with diabetes who don't know they have the disease decreased from 30 percent to 25 percent.

"It is concerning to know that we have more people developing diabetes, and these data are a reminder of the importance of increasing awareness of this condition, especially among people who are at high risk," Dr. Ann Albright, director of the CDC Division of Diabetes Translation, said in a prepared statement.

"On the other hand, it is good to see that more people are aware that they have diabetes. That is an indication that our efforts to increase awareness are working, and more importantly, that more people are better prepared to manage this disease and its complications," Albright said.

Among adults, diabetes increased in both men and women in all age groups, but the disease still disproportionately affects the elderly. Almost 25 percent of people aged 60 and older had diabetes in 2007, the CDC said.

Ethnic and minority disparities persist in rates of diagnosed diabetes: Native Americans and Alaska Natives, 16.5 percent; blacks, 11.8 percent; Hispanics, 10.4 percent; Asian Americans, 7.5 percent; and whites, 6.6 percent.

The data is in the 2007 Diabetes Fact Sheet developed by the CDC and other federal agencies.

The CDC also released estimates of diagnosed diabetes for all counties in the United States, which show higher rates of diabetes in areas of the Southeast and Appalachia where people traditionally been recognized as being at higher risk for heart disease, stroke and other chronic diseases.

"These data are an important step in identifying the places in a state that have the greatest number of people affected by diabetes. If states know which communities or areas have more people with diabetes, they can use that information to target their efforts or tailor them to meet the needs of specific communities," Albright said.

Diabetes, the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, can cause serious health complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower extremity amputations.

More information

The CDC has more about diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, June 24, 2008

Last Updated: June 24, 2008

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