ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Eating Less May Slow Aging Process
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
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24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 24 million Americans had diabetes in 2007, an increase of more than 3 million over two years, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday.

In addition, another 57 million Americans had pre-diabetes, which puts people at increased risk for diabetes.

There was some good news. Over two years, the proportion of people with diabetes who don't know they have the disease decreased from 30 percent to 25 percent.

"It is concerning to know that we have more people developing diabetes, and these data are a reminder of the importance of increasing awareness of this condition, especially among people who are at high risk," Dr. Ann Albright, director of the CDC Division of Diabetes Translation, said in a prepared statement.

"On the other hand, it is good to see that more people are aware that they have diabetes. That is an indication that our efforts to increase awareness are working, and more importantly, that more people are better prepared to manage this disease and its complications," Albright said.

Among adults, diabetes increased in both men and women in all age groups, but the disease still disproportionately affects the elderly. Almost 25 percent of people aged 60 and older had diabetes in 2007, the CDC said.

Ethnic and minority disparities persist in rates of diagnosed diabetes: Native Americans and Alaska Natives, 16.5 percent; blacks, 11.8 percent; Hispanics, 10.4 percent; Asian Americans, 7.5 percent; and whites, 6.6 percent.

The data is in the 2007 Diabetes Fact Sheet developed by the CDC and other federal agencies.

The CDC also released estimates of diagnosed diabetes for all counties in the United States, which show higher rates of diabetes in areas of the Southeast and Appalachia where people traditionally been recognized as being at higher risk for heart disease, stroke and other chronic diseases.

"These data are an important step in identifying the places in a state that have the greatest number of people affected by diabetes. If states know which communities or areas have more people with diabetes, they can use that information to target their efforts or tailor them to meet the needs of specific communities," Albright said.

Diabetes, the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, can cause serious health complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower extremity amputations.

More information

The CDC has more about diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, June 24, 2008

Last Updated: June 24, 2008

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