ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
CAREGIVING
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
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24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 24 million Americans had diabetes in 2007, an increase of more than 3 million over two years, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday.

In addition, another 57 million Americans had pre-diabetes, which puts people at increased risk for diabetes.

There was some good news. Over two years, the proportion of people with diabetes who don't know they have the disease decreased from 30 percent to 25 percent.

"It is concerning to know that we have more people developing diabetes, and these data are a reminder of the importance of increasing awareness of this condition, especially among people who are at high risk," Dr. Ann Albright, director of the CDC Division of Diabetes Translation, said in a prepared statement.

"On the other hand, it is good to see that more people are aware that they have diabetes. That is an indication that our efforts to increase awareness are working, and more importantly, that more people are better prepared to manage this disease and its complications," Albright said.

Among adults, diabetes increased in both men and women in all age groups, but the disease still disproportionately affects the elderly. Almost 25 percent of people aged 60 and older had diabetes in 2007, the CDC said.

Ethnic and minority disparities persist in rates of diagnosed diabetes: Native Americans and Alaska Natives, 16.5 percent; blacks, 11.8 percent; Hispanics, 10.4 percent; Asian Americans, 7.5 percent; and whites, 6.6 percent.

The data is in the 2007 Diabetes Fact Sheet developed by the CDC and other federal agencies.

The CDC also released estimates of diagnosed diabetes for all counties in the United States, which show higher rates of diabetes in areas of the Southeast and Appalachia where people traditionally been recognized as being at higher risk for heart disease, stroke and other chronic diseases.

"These data are an important step in identifying the places in a state that have the greatest number of people affected by diabetes. If states know which communities or areas have more people with diabetes, they can use that information to target their efforts or tailor them to meet the needs of specific communities," Albright said.

Diabetes, the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, can cause serious health complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower extremity amputations.

More information

The CDC has more about diabetes.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, June 24, 2008

Last Updated: June 24, 2008

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