ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
CANCER
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
CAREGIVING
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Kids More Apt to Smoke If Mom Did While Pregnant
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Smog Tougher on the Obese
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Drink Away Dementia?
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Add your Article

6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health

People who sleep less than six hours a night are 12 percent more likely to die prematurely than those who get the recommended six to eight hours of slumber, a new study has found.

The team of British and Italian researchers also found that sleeping too much -- more than nine hours a night -- doesn't increase the risk for death but might be an important sign of a serious or potentially fatal illness.

The researchers reviewed 16 studies that included more than 1.3 million people who were followed for up to 25 years. In that time, more than 100,000 deaths were recorded among the participants, who were from Asia, Europe and the United States.

The findings provide unequivocal evidence of the direct link between insufficient sleep and increased risk of premature death, said the authors of the study, which is published in the May issue of Sleep.

"Modern society has seen a gradual reduction in the average amount of sleep people take, and this pattern is more common amongst full-time workers, suggesting that it may be due to societal pressures for longer working hours and more shift-work," Francesco Cappuccio, leader of the Sleep, Health and Society Program at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, said in a university news release. "On the other hand, the deterioration of our health status is often accompanied by an extension of our sleeping time."

"Consistently sleeping six to eight hours per night may be optimal for health," he added. "The duration of sleep should be regarded as an additional behavioral risk factor, or risk marker, influenced by the environment and possibly amenable to change through both education and counseling as well as through measures of public health aimed at favorable modifications of the physical and working environments."

SOURCES: University of Warwick, news release, May 4, 2010 Published on: May 10, 2010