ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
EYE CARE, VISION
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
The Unmedicated Mind
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
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6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health

People who sleep less than six hours a night are 12 percent more likely to die prematurely than those who get the recommended six to eight hours of slumber, a new study has found.

The team of British and Italian researchers also found that sleeping too much -- more than nine hours a night -- doesn't increase the risk for death but might be an important sign of a serious or potentially fatal illness.

The researchers reviewed 16 studies that included more than 1.3 million people who were followed for up to 25 years. In that time, more than 100,000 deaths were recorded among the participants, who were from Asia, Europe and the United States.

The findings provide unequivocal evidence of the direct link between insufficient sleep and increased risk of premature death, said the authors of the study, which is published in the May issue of Sleep.

"Modern society has seen a gradual reduction in the average amount of sleep people take, and this pattern is more common amongst full-time workers, suggesting that it may be due to societal pressures for longer working hours and more shift-work," Francesco Cappuccio, leader of the Sleep, Health and Society Program at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, said in a university news release. "On the other hand, the deterioration of our health status is often accompanied by an extension of our sleeping time."

"Consistently sleeping six to eight hours per night may be optimal for health," he added. "The duration of sleep should be regarded as an additional behavioral risk factor, or risk marker, influenced by the environment and possibly amenable to change through both education and counseling as well as through measures of public health aimed at favorable modifications of the physical and working environments."

SOURCES: University of Warwick, news release, May 4, 2010 Published on: May 10, 2010