ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
CANCER
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
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6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health

People who sleep less than six hours a night are 12 percent more likely to die prematurely than those who get the recommended six to eight hours of slumber, a new study has found.

The team of British and Italian researchers also found that sleeping too much -- more than nine hours a night -- doesn't increase the risk for death but might be an important sign of a serious or potentially fatal illness.

The researchers reviewed 16 studies that included more than 1.3 million people who were followed for up to 25 years. In that time, more than 100,000 deaths were recorded among the participants, who were from Asia, Europe and the United States.

The findings provide unequivocal evidence of the direct link between insufficient sleep and increased risk of premature death, said the authors of the study, which is published in the May issue of Sleep.

"Modern society has seen a gradual reduction in the average amount of sleep people take, and this pattern is more common amongst full-time workers, suggesting that it may be due to societal pressures for longer working hours and more shift-work," Francesco Cappuccio, leader of the Sleep, Health and Society Program at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, said in a university news release. "On the other hand, the deterioration of our health status is often accompanied by an extension of our sleeping time."

"Consistently sleeping six to eight hours per night may be optimal for health," he added. "The duration of sleep should be regarded as an additional behavioral risk factor, or risk marker, influenced by the environment and possibly amenable to change through both education and counseling as well as through measures of public health aimed at favorable modifications of the physical and working environments."

SOURCES: University of Warwick, news release, May 4, 2010 Published on: May 10, 2010