ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
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6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health

People who sleep less than six hours a night are 12 percent more likely to die prematurely than those who get the recommended six to eight hours of slumber, a new study has found.

The team of British and Italian researchers also found that sleeping too much -- more than nine hours a night -- doesn't increase the risk for death but might be an important sign of a serious or potentially fatal illness.

The researchers reviewed 16 studies that included more than 1.3 million people who were followed for up to 25 years. In that time, more than 100,000 deaths were recorded among the participants, who were from Asia, Europe and the United States.

The findings provide unequivocal evidence of the direct link between insufficient sleep and increased risk of premature death, said the authors of the study, which is published in the May issue of Sleep.

"Modern society has seen a gradual reduction in the average amount of sleep people take, and this pattern is more common amongst full-time workers, suggesting that it may be due to societal pressures for longer working hours and more shift-work," Francesco Cappuccio, leader of the Sleep, Health and Society Program at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, said in a university news release. "On the other hand, the deterioration of our health status is often accompanied by an extension of our sleeping time."

"Consistently sleeping six to eight hours per night may be optimal for health," he added. "The duration of sleep should be regarded as an additional behavioral risk factor, or risk marker, influenced by the environment and possibly amenable to change through both education and counseling as well as through measures of public health aimed at favorable modifications of the physical and working environments."

SOURCES: University of Warwick, news release, May 4, 2010 Published on: May 10, 2010