ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Get to Know the Pap Test
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Add your Article

Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer

The active compounds in green tea might slow the progression of prostate cancer, the results of a small study suggest.

The study included 26 men, 41 to 72 years old, who had prostate cancer and were scheduled for radical prostatectomy. The men took four capsules a day of an investigational agent called Polyphenon E, an amount equivalent to about 12 cups of normally brewed, concentrated green tea. The men took the capsules for 12 to 73 days, with a median time of 34.5 days, but stopped the day before surgery.

The phase 2 study found "significant" reductions in the men's serum levels of markers predictive of prostate cancer progression, including hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and prostate specific antigen. In some men, reductions in levels of these markers were greater than 30 percent, the researchers found.

There were few reported side effects, and the men's liver function remained normal, according to James A. Cardelli, a professor and director of basic and translational research at the Feist-Weiller Cancer Center at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, and his research colleagues. The findings are reported in Cancer Prevention Research.

A recent year-long clinical trial in Italy found that consumption of green tea polyphenols reduced prostate cancer risk in men with high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia, according to a news release from the American Association for Cancer Research.

"These studies are just the beginning, and a lot of work remains to be done," Cardelli said in the news release. "However, we think that the use of tea polyphenols alone or in combination with other compounds currently used for cancer therapy should be explored as an approach to prevent cancer progression and recurrence."

SOURCES: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, June 19, 2009 Published on: June 19, 2009