ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating
Eating Less May Slow Aging Process
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
FITNESS
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Add your Article

Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer

The active compounds in green tea might slow the progression of prostate cancer, the results of a small study suggest.

The study included 26 men, 41 to 72 years old, who had prostate cancer and were scheduled for radical prostatectomy. The men took four capsules a day of an investigational agent called Polyphenon E, an amount equivalent to about 12 cups of normally brewed, concentrated green tea. The men took the capsules for 12 to 73 days, with a median time of 34.5 days, but stopped the day before surgery.

The phase 2 study found "significant" reductions in the men's serum levels of markers predictive of prostate cancer progression, including hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and prostate specific antigen. In some men, reductions in levels of these markers were greater than 30 percent, the researchers found.

There were few reported side effects, and the men's liver function remained normal, according to James A. Cardelli, a professor and director of basic and translational research at the Feist-Weiller Cancer Center at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, and his research colleagues. The findings are reported in Cancer Prevention Research.

A recent year-long clinical trial in Italy found that consumption of green tea polyphenols reduced prostate cancer risk in men with high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia, according to a news release from the American Association for Cancer Research.

"These studies are just the beginning, and a lot of work remains to be done," Cardelli said in the news release. "However, we think that the use of tea polyphenols alone or in combination with other compounds currently used for cancer therapy should be explored as an approach to prevent cancer progression and recurrence."

SOURCES: American Association for Cancer Research, news release, June 19, 2009 Published on: June 19, 2009