ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EYE CARE, VISION
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
Barefoot Best for Running?
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Add your Article

A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay

Regular walking significantly reduces stroke risk in women, researchers say.

In a new study that looked at data from 39,315 U.S. female health professionals, average age 54, participating in the Women's Health Study, 473 of the women had an ischemic (clot-related) stroke and 102 had a hemorrhagic (bleeding) stroke during 11.9 years of follow-up. Those who were most active in their leisure time were 17 percent less likely to have any type of stroke than those who were least active.

The study, published April 6 in the journal Stroke, focused on comparing women who walked regularly to those who didn't walk, and found:

* Those who usually walked at a brisk pace were 37 percent less likely to have any type of stroke and had a 68 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Those who walked two or more hours a week had a 30 percent lower risk of any type of stroke and a 57 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Women who usually walked at a brisk pace were about 25 percent less likely to suffer an ischemic stroke, and those who walked more than two hours a week were less likely to have an ischemic stroke.

"Physical activity, including regular walking, is an important modifiable behavior for stroke prevention," lead author Jacob R. Sattelmair, a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, said in a news release from the American Heart Association. "Physical activity is essential to promoting cardiovascular health and reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, and walking is one way of achieving physical activity."

Previous studies have found that active people are 25 percent to 30 percent less likely to have a stroke than inactive people.

"Though the exact relationship among different types of physical activity and different stroke subtypes remains unclear, the results of this specific study indicate that walking, in particular, is associated with lower risk of stroke," Sattelmair said.

Adults should do at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity, aerobic activity, according to the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: American Heart Association, news release, April 6, 2010 Published on: April 06, 2010