ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
ANIMAL CARE
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Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
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'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Add your Article

A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay

Regular walking significantly reduces stroke risk in women, researchers say.

In a new study that looked at data from 39,315 U.S. female health professionals, average age 54, participating in the Women's Health Study, 473 of the women had an ischemic (clot-related) stroke and 102 had a hemorrhagic (bleeding) stroke during 11.9 years of follow-up. Those who were most active in their leisure time were 17 percent less likely to have any type of stroke than those who were least active.

The study, published April 6 in the journal Stroke, focused on comparing women who walked regularly to those who didn't walk, and found:

* Those who usually walked at a brisk pace were 37 percent less likely to have any type of stroke and had a 68 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Those who walked two or more hours a week had a 30 percent lower risk of any type of stroke and a 57 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Women who usually walked at a brisk pace were about 25 percent less likely to suffer an ischemic stroke, and those who walked more than two hours a week were less likely to have an ischemic stroke.

"Physical activity, including regular walking, is an important modifiable behavior for stroke prevention," lead author Jacob R. Sattelmair, a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, said in a news release from the American Heart Association. "Physical activity is essential to promoting cardiovascular health and reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, and walking is one way of achieving physical activity."

Previous studies have found that active people are 25 percent to 30 percent less likely to have a stroke than inactive people.

"Though the exact relationship among different types of physical activity and different stroke subtypes remains unclear, the results of this specific study indicate that walking, in particular, is associated with lower risk of stroke," Sattelmair said.

Adults should do at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity, aerobic activity, according to the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: American Heart Association, news release, April 6, 2010 Published on: April 06, 2010