ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
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A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay

Regular walking significantly reduces stroke risk in women, researchers say.

In a new study that looked at data from 39,315 U.S. female health professionals, average age 54, participating in the Women's Health Study, 473 of the women had an ischemic (clot-related) stroke and 102 had a hemorrhagic (bleeding) stroke during 11.9 years of follow-up. Those who were most active in their leisure time were 17 percent less likely to have any type of stroke than those who were least active.

The study, published April 6 in the journal Stroke, focused on comparing women who walked regularly to those who didn't walk, and found:

* Those who usually walked at a brisk pace were 37 percent less likely to have any type of stroke and had a 68 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Those who walked two or more hours a week had a 30 percent lower risk of any type of stroke and a 57 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Women who usually walked at a brisk pace were about 25 percent less likely to suffer an ischemic stroke, and those who walked more than two hours a week were less likely to have an ischemic stroke.

"Physical activity, including regular walking, is an important modifiable behavior for stroke prevention," lead author Jacob R. Sattelmair, a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, said in a news release from the American Heart Association. "Physical activity is essential to promoting cardiovascular health and reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, and walking is one way of achieving physical activity."

Previous studies have found that active people are 25 percent to 30 percent less likely to have a stroke than inactive people.

"Though the exact relationship among different types of physical activity and different stroke subtypes remains unclear, the results of this specific study indicate that walking, in particular, is associated with lower risk of stroke," Sattelmair said.

Adults should do at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity, aerobic activity, according to the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: American Heart Association, news release, April 6, 2010 Published on: April 06, 2010