ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
CAREGIVING
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Sleep and Do Better
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
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A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay

Regular walking significantly reduces stroke risk in women, researchers say.

In a new study that looked at data from 39,315 U.S. female health professionals, average age 54, participating in the Women's Health Study, 473 of the women had an ischemic (clot-related) stroke and 102 had a hemorrhagic (bleeding) stroke during 11.9 years of follow-up. Those who were most active in their leisure time were 17 percent less likely to have any type of stroke than those who were least active.

The study, published April 6 in the journal Stroke, focused on comparing women who walked regularly to those who didn't walk, and found:

* Those who usually walked at a brisk pace were 37 percent less likely to have any type of stroke and had a 68 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Those who walked two or more hours a week had a 30 percent lower risk of any type of stroke and a 57 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Women who usually walked at a brisk pace were about 25 percent less likely to suffer an ischemic stroke, and those who walked more than two hours a week were less likely to have an ischemic stroke.

"Physical activity, including regular walking, is an important modifiable behavior for stroke prevention," lead author Jacob R. Sattelmair, a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, said in a news release from the American Heart Association. "Physical activity is essential to promoting cardiovascular health and reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, and walking is one way of achieving physical activity."

Previous studies have found that active people are 25 percent to 30 percent less likely to have a stroke than inactive people.

"Though the exact relationship among different types of physical activity and different stroke subtypes remains unclear, the results of this specific study indicate that walking, in particular, is associated with lower risk of stroke," Sattelmair said.

Adults should do at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity, aerobic activity, according to the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: American Heart Association, news release, April 6, 2010 Published on: April 06, 2010