ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
CANCER
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
10 Beginner Tips for Fast Weight Loss, the Low-Carb Way!
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
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A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay

Regular walking significantly reduces stroke risk in women, researchers say.

In a new study that looked at data from 39,315 U.S. female health professionals, average age 54, participating in the Women's Health Study, 473 of the women had an ischemic (clot-related) stroke and 102 had a hemorrhagic (bleeding) stroke during 11.9 years of follow-up. Those who were most active in their leisure time were 17 percent less likely to have any type of stroke than those who were least active.

The study, published April 6 in the journal Stroke, focused on comparing women who walked regularly to those who didn't walk, and found:

* Those who usually walked at a brisk pace were 37 percent less likely to have any type of stroke and had a 68 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Those who walked two or more hours a week had a 30 percent lower risk of any type of stroke and a 57 percent lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke.
* Women who usually walked at a brisk pace were about 25 percent less likely to suffer an ischemic stroke, and those who walked more than two hours a week were less likely to have an ischemic stroke.

"Physical activity, including regular walking, is an important modifiable behavior for stroke prevention," lead author Jacob R. Sattelmair, a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, said in a news release from the American Heart Association. "Physical activity is essential to promoting cardiovascular health and reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, and walking is one way of achieving physical activity."

Previous studies have found that active people are 25 percent to 30 percent less likely to have a stroke than inactive people.

"Though the exact relationship among different types of physical activity and different stroke subtypes remains unclear, the results of this specific study indicate that walking, in particular, is associated with lower risk of stroke," Sattelmair said.

Adults should do at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity, aerobic activity, according to the American Heart Association.

SOURCES: American Heart Association, news release, April 6, 2010 Published on: April 06, 2010