ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Eating Free Range
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Countdown to Hair Loss
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Add your Article

A Honey of a Sinusitis Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Honey may help bring sweet relief to chronic sinusitis sufferers, new Canadian research suggests.

Scientists say natural germ fighters in honey attack the bacteria that cause the discomforting disorder.

"Honey has been used in traditional medicine as a natural anti-microbial dressing for infected wounds for hundreds of years," noted study co-author Dr. Joseph G. Marsan, from the University of Ottawa.

The objectives of the study were to evaluate the activity of honey on so-called "biofilms," which are responsible for numerous chronic infections, Marsan explained.

"Certain bacteria, mainly Staph aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have found a method of shielding themselves from the activity of anti-microbials by living in substances called biofilms, which cannot be penetrated by even the most powerful anti-microbials," he said.

The report was to be presented Tuesday at the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation's annual meeting in Chicago.

In the laboratory, Marsan's team applied honey to biofilms made up of the bacteria that cause sinusitis.

They found that honey was more effective in killing these bacteria than antibiotics commonly used against them.

"Our study has shown that certain honeys, namely the Manuka honey from New Zealand and the Sidr honey from Yemen, have a powerful killing action on these bacterial biofilms that is far superior to the most powerful anti-microbials used in medicine today," Marsan said.

This study has shown that certain honeys may play some role in the management of these chronic infections that are extremely difficult to treat, Marsan said. "This study was carried out in-vitro in the lab and we must now find how to apply this activity in-vivo on lab animals and subsequently on patients," he added.

The Canadian findings echo research published last year in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, by a team at Penn State College of Medicine. That group found that honey worked better than commercial cough medicines containing dextromethorphan (DM) in easing children's cough.

But Dr. Ian Paul, director of Pediatric Clinical Research at Penn State and the leader of the cough study, isn't sure how the sinusitis findings would be applied clinically.

"Bacteria do not grow very well in honey," Paul noted. "There is data that honey works well for wounds, in smothering the bacteria that that grow in wounds. So it's not altogether surprising that honey would be effective in killing these bacteria."

However, whether honey could be used clinically to treat sinusitis isn't apparent, Paul said.

"I wonder how they are going to propose using honey, clinically, in sinusitis," Paul said. "I'm wondering how they are proposing it would be curative or helpful in that setting?"

Results of another study, slated to be presented at the meeting Tuesday, show that many patients with sinusitis sufferer from aches and pains that are equal to those experienced by people with arthritis or depression.

Researchers found that endoscopic sinus surgery to relieve the blockage in the sinuses, also significantly people's reduced pain.

"This study highlights an important point: Chronic sinusitis should not be considered as a minor localized disease condition rather, as this study emphasizes, sinusitis can cause serious clinical levels of discomfort in many patients," study co-author Dr. Neil Bhattacharyya, an otolaryngologist and sinus surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, said in a statement.

More information

For more information on sinusitis, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.



SOURCES: Joseph G. Marsan, M.D., University of Ottawa, Canada; Ian Paul, M.D., M.Sc., director, Pediatric Clinical Research, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey; Sept. 23, 2008, presentation, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation Annual Meeting, Chicago

Last Updated: Sept. 24, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com