ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's

Drinking light to moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk for developing both Alzheimer's and some forms of age-related dementia, new German research suggests.

Though noting that full-fledged alcohol abuse accounts for about 10 percent of all dementia cases, the researchers reported that consumption of just one to two drinks a day appears to protect against the overall incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

They caution, however, that the study found no evidence of a lower risk for either vascular dementia or general cognitive decline. Nor was it clear whether the risk varied by the type of alcohol consumed.

The findings, reported in the March 2 online edition of Age and Ageing, stem from periodic interviews over a three-year span with 3,327 participants, all 65 years of age and older. When the study began, 3,202 had no dementia, and the calculation of incident cases of dementia is based on these participants.

At the start of the study, about half of the participants did not drink, about one-fourth consumed less than one alcoholic drink a day, nearly 13 percent had one or two drinks daily and about 12 percent had more than two drinks a day. Wine was the most popular choice, followed by beer and then a mix of alcoholic beverages.

By the end of the study, 217 participants (7 percent) had developed dementia and 111 (3.5 percent) had Alzheimer's disease, the investigators found.

Light to moderate alcohol consumption was found to be associated with a lower incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's, and overall was tied to relatively good physical and mental health, Siegfried Weyerer, of the Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim, Germany, and colleagues reported.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on dementia.