ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
CANCER
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
CAREGIVING
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
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A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's

Drinking light to moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk for developing both Alzheimer's and some forms of age-related dementia, new German research suggests.

Though noting that full-fledged alcohol abuse accounts for about 10 percent of all dementia cases, the researchers reported that consumption of just one to two drinks a day appears to protect against the overall incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

They caution, however, that the study found no evidence of a lower risk for either vascular dementia or general cognitive decline. Nor was it clear whether the risk varied by the type of alcohol consumed.

The findings, reported in the March 2 online edition of Age and Ageing, stem from periodic interviews over a three-year span with 3,327 participants, all 65 years of age and older. When the study began, 3,202 had no dementia, and the calculation of incident cases of dementia is based on these participants.

At the start of the study, about half of the participants did not drink, about one-fourth consumed less than one alcoholic drink a day, nearly 13 percent had one or two drinks daily and about 12 percent had more than two drinks a day. Wine was the most popular choice, followed by beer and then a mix of alcoholic beverages.

By the end of the study, 217 participants (7 percent) had developed dementia and 111 (3.5 percent) had Alzheimer's disease, the investigators found.

Light to moderate alcohol consumption was found to be associated with a lower incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's, and overall was tied to relatively good physical and mental health, Siegfried Weyerer, of the Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim, Germany, and colleagues reported.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on dementia.