ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
U.S. Prepares for Possible Return of Swine Flu in Fall
Multivitamins Might Prolong Life
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
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A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good

For those who believe in the Easter bunny (or at least in what he is believed to bring), good news awaits.

Just one small square of chocolate a day might help lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk for heart disease.

After analyzing the diet and health habits of 19,357 people, aged 35 to 65, for at least 10 years, German researchers found that those who ate the most chocolate (an average of 7.5 grams, or 0.3 ounces, a day) had lower blood pressure and were 39 percent less likely to have a heart attack than those who ate the least amount of chocolate (an average of 1.7 grams, or 0.06 ounces, a day).

"To put that in terms of absolute risk, if people in the group eating the least amount of chocolate [of whom 219 per 10,000 had a heart attack or stroke] increased their chocolate intake by 6 grams [0.2 ounces] a day, 85 fewer heart attacks and strokes per 10,000 people could be expected to occur over a period of about 10 years," study leader Dr. Brian Buijsse, a nutritional epidemiologist at the German Institute of Human Nutrition, said in a news release from the European Heart Journal, which published the findings online Tuesday.

"If the 39 percent lower risk is generalized to the general population, the number of avoidable heart attacks and strokes could be higher because the absolute risk in the general population is higher," he said.

Six grams of chocolate is equivalent to about one small square of a 100 gram (3.5 ounce) bar, the researchers said.

But Buijsse cautioned that eating chocolate shouldn't increase a person's overall intake of calories or reduce the consumption of healthy foods.

"Small amounts of chocolate may help to prevent heart disease, but only if it replaces other energy-dense foods, such as snacks, in order to keep body weight stable," he said.

SOURCES: European Heart Journal, news release, March 30, 2010 Published on: March 30, 2010