ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Eat Light - Live Longer
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Add your Article

A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good

For those who believe in the Easter bunny (or at least in what he is believed to bring), good news awaits.

Just one small square of chocolate a day might help lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk for heart disease.

After analyzing the diet and health habits of 19,357 people, aged 35 to 65, for at least 10 years, German researchers found that those who ate the most chocolate (an average of 7.5 grams, or 0.3 ounces, a day) had lower blood pressure and were 39 percent less likely to have a heart attack than those who ate the least amount of chocolate (an average of 1.7 grams, or 0.06 ounces, a day).

"To put that in terms of absolute risk, if people in the group eating the least amount of chocolate [of whom 219 per 10,000 had a heart attack or stroke] increased their chocolate intake by 6 grams [0.2 ounces] a day, 85 fewer heart attacks and strokes per 10,000 people could be expected to occur over a period of about 10 years," study leader Dr. Brian Buijsse, a nutritional epidemiologist at the German Institute of Human Nutrition, said in a news release from the European Heart Journal, which published the findings online Tuesday.

"If the 39 percent lower risk is generalized to the general population, the number of avoidable heart attacks and strokes could be higher because the absolute risk in the general population is higher," he said.

Six grams of chocolate is equivalent to about one small square of a 100 gram (3.5 ounce) bar, the researchers said.

But Buijsse cautioned that eating chocolate shouldn't increase a person's overall intake of calories or reduce the consumption of healthy foods.

"Small amounts of chocolate may help to prevent heart disease, but only if it replaces other energy-dense foods, such as snacks, in order to keep body weight stable," he said.

SOURCES: European Heart Journal, news release, March 30, 2010 Published on: March 30, 2010