ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
FITNESS
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
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Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics

THURSDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- In people with diabetes, there's a strong association between abnormal heart rhythm, or atrial fibrillation, and increased risk of other heart-related problems and death, according to a study that included 11,140 people.

Researchers found that participants who had atrial fibrillation (AF) at the start of the study were 61 percent more likely to die from any cause, 77 percent more likely to die from cardiovascular causes such as a heart attack or stroke, and 68 percent more likely to develop heart failure or other problems such as stroke.

But the study also found that the risk of developing complications or dying was lower if doctors gave more aggressive treatments to diabetic patients with AF. In this study, treatment involved a combination of the blood pressure lowering drugs perindopril and indapamide.

"Active treatment produced similar relative benefits to patients with and without AF. However, because of their higher risk at the start of the study, the absolute benefit associated with active treatment was greater in patients with AF than without. We estimate that five years of active treatment would prevent one death among every 42 patients with AF and one death among 120 patients without AF," noted study leader Professor Anushka Patel, director of the Cardiovascular Division at The George Institute for International Health at the University of Sydney in Australia.

The researchers also found that the association between AF and deaths from cardiovascular disease was much stronger in women than in men. Women with AF were twice as likely to die as women without AF, while men with AF were 50 percent more likely to die than men without AF.

The findings were published March 12 in the European Heart Journal.

"This study informs clinicians that AF is a marker of greater risk of cardiovascular events and mortality among diabetics, both men and women. Such patients should have their cardiovascular risk factors, such as blood pressure and cholesterol, controlled more aggressively," Patel advised.

"This is a separate issue from rate and rhythm control [or the use of anticoagulants to prevent thromboembolic events], which is the usual therapeutic focus in patients with AF. These issues are important, but we believe our data suggest that heightened awareness and management of overall cardiovascular risk is also important."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about atrial fibrillation.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, March 12, 2009

Last Updated: March 12, 2009

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