ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
FITNESS
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics

THURSDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- In people with diabetes, there's a strong association between abnormal heart rhythm, or atrial fibrillation, and increased risk of other heart-related problems and death, according to a study that included 11,140 people.

Researchers found that participants who had atrial fibrillation (AF) at the start of the study were 61 percent more likely to die from any cause, 77 percent more likely to die from cardiovascular causes such as a heart attack or stroke, and 68 percent more likely to develop heart failure or other problems such as stroke.

But the study also found that the risk of developing complications or dying was lower if doctors gave more aggressive treatments to diabetic patients with AF. In this study, treatment involved a combination of the blood pressure lowering drugs perindopril and indapamide.

"Active treatment produced similar relative benefits to patients with and without AF. However, because of their higher risk at the start of the study, the absolute benefit associated with active treatment was greater in patients with AF than without. We estimate that five years of active treatment would prevent one death among every 42 patients with AF and one death among 120 patients without AF," noted study leader Professor Anushka Patel, director of the Cardiovascular Division at The George Institute for International Health at the University of Sydney in Australia.

The researchers also found that the association between AF and deaths from cardiovascular disease was much stronger in women than in men. Women with AF were twice as likely to die as women without AF, while men with AF were 50 percent more likely to die than men without AF.

The findings were published March 12 in the European Heart Journal.

"This study informs clinicians that AF is a marker of greater risk of cardiovascular events and mortality among diabetics, both men and women. Such patients should have their cardiovascular risk factors, such as blood pressure and cholesterol, controlled more aggressively," Patel advised.

"This is a separate issue from rate and rhythm control [or the use of anticoagulants to prevent thromboembolic events], which is the usual therapeutic focus in patients with AF. These issues are important, but we believe our data suggest that heightened awareness and management of overall cardiovascular risk is also important."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about atrial fibrillation.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, March 12, 2009

Last Updated: March 12, 2009

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