ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
CANCER
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Barefoot Best for Running?
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Can You Talk Your Way to Happy?
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Add your Article

Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics

THURSDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- In people with diabetes, there's a strong association between abnormal heart rhythm, or atrial fibrillation, and increased risk of other heart-related problems and death, according to a study that included 11,140 people.

Researchers found that participants who had atrial fibrillation (AF) at the start of the study were 61 percent more likely to die from any cause, 77 percent more likely to die from cardiovascular causes such as a heart attack or stroke, and 68 percent more likely to develop heart failure or other problems such as stroke.

But the study also found that the risk of developing complications or dying was lower if doctors gave more aggressive treatments to diabetic patients with AF. In this study, treatment involved a combination of the blood pressure lowering drugs perindopril and indapamide.

"Active treatment produced similar relative benefits to patients with and without AF. However, because of their higher risk at the start of the study, the absolute benefit associated with active treatment was greater in patients with AF than without. We estimate that five years of active treatment would prevent one death among every 42 patients with AF and one death among 120 patients without AF," noted study leader Professor Anushka Patel, director of the Cardiovascular Division at The George Institute for International Health at the University of Sydney in Australia.

The researchers also found that the association between AF and deaths from cardiovascular disease was much stronger in women than in men. Women with AF were twice as likely to die as women without AF, while men with AF were 50 percent more likely to die than men without AF.

The findings were published March 12 in the European Heart Journal.

"This study informs clinicians that AF is a marker of greater risk of cardiovascular events and mortality among diabetics, both men and women. Such patients should have their cardiovascular risk factors, such as blood pressure and cholesterol, controlled more aggressively," Patel advised.

"This is a separate issue from rate and rhythm control [or the use of anticoagulants to prevent thromboembolic events], which is the usual therapeutic focus in patients with AF. These issues are important, but we believe our data suggest that heightened awareness and management of overall cardiovascular risk is also important."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about atrial fibrillation.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, March 12, 2009

Last Updated: March 12, 2009

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