ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
CAREGIVING
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Add your Article

Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains

FRIDAY, April 3 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to higher levels of environmental lead earlier in the life span may be taking a toll on the brains of older American women, a new study finds.

The Harvard study shows that women aged 47 to 74 who tested positive for lead in their blood (indicating a recent exposure to the metal) or bones (an indication of cumulative exposure over the life span) did somewhat worse on cognitive tests than those who did not show signs of lead exposure.

In the study, the researchers noted that regulatory changes phased out higher lead content in products such as gasoline during the 1980s, so that lead is at a relatively low level today.

So, only those women with lead biomarkers found in their tibia bone, an indication of long-ago exposure, scored poorly enough to be considered statistically significant, according to the study.

The study, which analyzed lead levels and cognitive scores in almost 600 women from the Boston area, is in the April issue of Environmental Health Perspectives.

"Findings in this study are important because of their long-range consequences on the public health of an aging generation," the journal's editor-in-chief, Hugh A. Tilson, said in a journal news release. "Impaired cognition and cognitive decline in older women are associated with heightened risks of dementia, physical disability, hospitalization and reduced quality of life in later years."

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about lead poisoning.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, news release, March 27, 2009

Last Updated: April 03, 2009

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