ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Even in 'Last Supper,' Portion Sizes Have Grown
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
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Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

(HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture and exercise may help women better handle the symptoms and risks that come with hormone imbalances caused by certain ovarian cysts, Swedish researchers report.

About one in 10 women of reproductive age have polycystic ovarian syndrome, a condition that can start in the teen years and cause irregular menstrual cycles and infertility. Small immature cysts on the ovaries disrupt hormone production, causing excessive secretion of testosterone, the male sex hormone. In addition to infertility, it can increase a woman's odds of becoming obese and developing type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease, the study authors explained.

While the syndrome's cause remains mysterious, researchers believe it is linked to a highly active sympathetic nervous system, part of the body's internal controls that regulate several functions one cannot willingly manage, such as how wide one's pupils dilate.

In the study, women with polycystic ovarian syndrome were separated into three groups: one group received regular electro-acupuncture, in which weak electric current is sent through the needles; another group was given heart-rate monitors and told to exercise three or more times per week; the last group was given no additional treatment or instructions. After a four-month period, women in the acupuncture and exercise groups ended up with lower sympathetic nervous system activity, though the acupuncture group received additional benefits, the researchers found.

"Those who received acupuncture found that their menstruation became more normal. We could also see that their levels of testosterone became significantly lower, and this is an important observation, since elevated testosterone levels are closely connected with the increased activity in the sympathetic nervous system of women," study author Elisabet Stener-Victorin, an associate professor who has led the research at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, said in a news release issued by the institution.

SOURCES: University of Gothenburg, news release, Aug. 27, 2009