ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
What you need to know about swine flu.
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Add your Article

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The death rate for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) hasn't changed since 1994, according to a study that contradicts the common belief there's been a steady decline in the percentage of ARDS patients who die.

The researchers reviewed studies conducted between 1984 and 2006, and found the death rate for patients with ARDS and related acute lung injury (ALI) is 40 percent to 45 percent, much higher than the suggested benchmark rate of 25 percent to 30 percent.

The findings were published in the first February issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

ARDS is lung condition that develops when trauma to the lungs leads to inflammation, accumulation of fluid in the lungs, low blood oxygen, and respiratory distress.

"The main finding of our systematic review is that mortality due to ARDS has remained static at 44 percent for observational studies and 36 percent for randomized controlled trials since a standard definition [of ARDS] was introduced in 1994," wrote Dr. Niall Ferguson, director of clinical research and critical care medicine at the University Health Network of the University of Toronto.

He said the findings "highlight the need for future effective therapeutic interventions for this highly lethal syndrome."

Ferguson and his colleagues suggested several factors may contribute to the high death rate among ARDS patients, such as an inadequate number of effective therapies for ARDS and inconsistent use of the effective therapies that do exist.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about ARDS.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, Jan. 23, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 23, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com