ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
FITNESS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
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Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The death rate for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) hasn't changed since 1994, according to a study that contradicts the common belief there's been a steady decline in the percentage of ARDS patients who die.

The researchers reviewed studies conducted between 1984 and 2006, and found the death rate for patients with ARDS and related acute lung injury (ALI) is 40 percent to 45 percent, much higher than the suggested benchmark rate of 25 percent to 30 percent.

The findings were published in the first February issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

ARDS is lung condition that develops when trauma to the lungs leads to inflammation, accumulation of fluid in the lungs, low blood oxygen, and respiratory distress.

"The main finding of our systematic review is that mortality due to ARDS has remained static at 44 percent for observational studies and 36 percent for randomized controlled trials since a standard definition [of ARDS] was introduced in 1994," wrote Dr. Niall Ferguson, director of clinical research and critical care medicine at the University Health Network of the University of Toronto.

He said the findings "highlight the need for future effective therapeutic interventions for this highly lethal syndrome."

Ferguson and his colleagues suggested several factors may contribute to the high death rate among ARDS patients, such as an inadequate number of effective therapies for ARDS and inconsistent use of the effective therapies that do exist.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about ARDS.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, Jan. 23, 2009

Last Updated: Jan. 23, 2009

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