ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Know Your Asthma Triggers
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
EYE CARE, VISION
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
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Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight

THURSDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- More than two-thirds of U.S. adults mistakenly believe that daily medicine can be taken to prevent a food allergy reaction, according to a survey that found a widespread lack of knowledge and awareness about food allergy among the general public.

The online survey of 2,148 adults also found that nearly half of respondents incorrectly believed that there is a cure for food allergy. More than 40 percent wrongly said that life-threatening allergic reactions could be prevented through means other than strict allergen avoidance, the researchers noted.

"The public's food allergy knowledge and awareness is critical to the safety of children with food allergy, especially since 76 percent of food allergy-related deaths follow consumption of foods outside of the home. Food allergy is a growing concern, affecting an estimated 6 percent to 8 percent of children in the United States," study author Dr. Ruchi S. Gupta, of Children's Memorial Research Center in Chicago, said in a news release from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

The survey also found that 85 percent of respondents agreed that schools should have plans to keep food-allergic children safe, according to the report in the July issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

"Although there was agreement that schools need better policies to manage food allergies, most parents were not in favor of implementation of specific school policies, such as banning peanut products and having special tables for food-allergic children," Gupta said in the news release.

"The public's knowledge was strongest regarding symptoms and severity of food allergy, with nearly 95 percent of participants recognizing food allergy as a potentially fatal condition," the researchers noted.

SOURCES: American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, news release, July 2009