ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
CAREGIVING
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Add your Article

Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight

THURSDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- More than two-thirds of U.S. adults mistakenly believe that daily medicine can be taken to prevent a food allergy reaction, according to a survey that found a widespread lack of knowledge and awareness about food allergy among the general public.

The online survey of 2,148 adults also found that nearly half of respondents incorrectly believed that there is a cure for food allergy. More than 40 percent wrongly said that life-threatening allergic reactions could be prevented through means other than strict allergen avoidance, the researchers noted.

"The public's food allergy knowledge and awareness is critical to the safety of children with food allergy, especially since 76 percent of food allergy-related deaths follow consumption of foods outside of the home. Food allergy is a growing concern, affecting an estimated 6 percent to 8 percent of children in the United States," study author Dr. Ruchi S. Gupta, of Children's Memorial Research Center in Chicago, said in a news release from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

The survey also found that 85 percent of respondents agreed that schools should have plans to keep food-allergic children safe, according to the report in the July issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

"Although there was agreement that schools need better policies to manage food allergies, most parents were not in favor of implementation of specific school policies, such as banning peanut products and having special tables for food-allergic children," Gupta said in the news release.

"The public's knowledge was strongest regarding symptoms and severity of food allergy, with nearly 95 percent of participants recognizing food allergy as a potentially fatal condition," the researchers noted.

SOURCES: American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, news release, July 2009