ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
CANCER
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Add your Article

After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again

Low-intensity exercise can reduce depression and improve recovery after a stroke, a new study shows.

The finding stems from Canadian research involving 103 people who'd had a stroke and were receiving standard follow-up care in a hospital. About half were then enrolled in an additional experimental effort called the Graded Repetitive Arm Supplementary Program (GRASP).

The GRASP group spent 35 minutes four times a week doing such non-intense arm exercises as buttoning a shirt, pouring water into a glass and playing speed and accuracy games. The functioning of arms and hands that had been affected by the stroke improved, on average, 33 percent for these participants, the study found. The amount that people used their arms and hands increased as well.

"At four weeks, the GRASP patients also reported less depressive symptoms and greater change scores than those in the control group did," Dr. Jocelyn Harris, a researcher with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, said in a news release from the group. "The GRASP patients all did better -- much better."

The study was scheduled to be presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress, meeting June 7 and 8 in Quebec City.

"The power of physical activity to raise the spirits of recovering stroke patients is stronger than anyone suspected," said Harris, who has said she would like to make the GRASP program available beyond the hospital setting.

Dr. Michael Hill, a spokesman for the foundation, acknowledged that people who've had a stroke frequently have symptoms of depression in subsequent weeks. "Depression may be a direct result of the damage to a region of brain and, in addition, the sudden change in ability and life circumstances," he said in the news release.

"It's important to know that depression is treatable," Hill said. "Patients and caregivers should mention depressive symptoms and seek treatment during follow-up visits with their neurologist, internist or family physician."

SOURCES: Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, news release, June 7, 2010 Published on: June 07, 2010