ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
FITNESS
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Any Old Cane Won't Do
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again

Low-intensity exercise can reduce depression and improve recovery after a stroke, a new study shows.

The finding stems from Canadian research involving 103 people who'd had a stroke and were receiving standard follow-up care in a hospital. About half were then enrolled in an additional experimental effort called the Graded Repetitive Arm Supplementary Program (GRASP).

The GRASP group spent 35 minutes four times a week doing such non-intense arm exercises as buttoning a shirt, pouring water into a glass and playing speed and accuracy games. The functioning of arms and hands that had been affected by the stroke improved, on average, 33 percent for these participants, the study found. The amount that people used their arms and hands increased as well.

"At four weeks, the GRASP patients also reported less depressive symptoms and greater change scores than those in the control group did," Dr. Jocelyn Harris, a researcher with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, said in a news release from the group. "The GRASP patients all did better -- much better."

The study was scheduled to be presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress, meeting June 7 and 8 in Quebec City.

"The power of physical activity to raise the spirits of recovering stroke patients is stronger than anyone suspected," said Harris, who has said she would like to make the GRASP program available beyond the hospital setting.

Dr. Michael Hill, a spokesman for the foundation, acknowledged that people who've had a stroke frequently have symptoms of depression in subsequent weeks. "Depression may be a direct result of the damage to a region of brain and, in addition, the sudden change in ability and life circumstances," he said in the news release.

"It's important to know that depression is treatable," Hill said. "Patients and caregivers should mention depressive symptoms and seek treatment during follow-up visits with their neurologist, internist or family physician."

SOURCES: Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, news release, June 7, 2010 Published on: June 07, 2010