ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
CANCER
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Tune Up Your Health With Music
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Add your Article

After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again

Low-intensity exercise can reduce depression and improve recovery after a stroke, a new study shows.

The finding stems from Canadian research involving 103 people who'd had a stroke and were receiving standard follow-up care in a hospital. About half were then enrolled in an additional experimental effort called the Graded Repetitive Arm Supplementary Program (GRASP).

The GRASP group spent 35 minutes four times a week doing such non-intense arm exercises as buttoning a shirt, pouring water into a glass and playing speed and accuracy games. The functioning of arms and hands that had been affected by the stroke improved, on average, 33 percent for these participants, the study found. The amount that people used their arms and hands increased as well.

"At four weeks, the GRASP patients also reported less depressive symptoms and greater change scores than those in the control group did," Dr. Jocelyn Harris, a researcher with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, said in a news release from the group. "The GRASP patients all did better -- much better."

The study was scheduled to be presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress, meeting June 7 and 8 in Quebec City.

"The power of physical activity to raise the spirits of recovering stroke patients is stronger than anyone suspected," said Harris, who has said she would like to make the GRASP program available beyond the hospital setting.

Dr. Michael Hill, a spokesman for the foundation, acknowledged that people who've had a stroke frequently have symptoms of depression in subsequent weeks. "Depression may be a direct result of the damage to a region of brain and, in addition, the sudden change in ability and life circumstances," he said in the news release.

"It's important to know that depression is treatable," Hill said. "Patients and caregivers should mention depressive symptoms and seek treatment during follow-up visits with their neurologist, internist or family physician."

SOURCES: Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, news release, June 7, 2010 Published on: June 07, 2010