ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
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After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again

Low-intensity exercise can reduce depression and improve recovery after a stroke, a new study shows.

The finding stems from Canadian research involving 103 people who'd had a stroke and were receiving standard follow-up care in a hospital. About half were then enrolled in an additional experimental effort called the Graded Repetitive Arm Supplementary Program (GRASP).

The GRASP group spent 35 minutes four times a week doing such non-intense arm exercises as buttoning a shirt, pouring water into a glass and playing speed and accuracy games. The functioning of arms and hands that had been affected by the stroke improved, on average, 33 percent for these participants, the study found. The amount that people used their arms and hands increased as well.

"At four weeks, the GRASP patients also reported less depressive symptoms and greater change scores than those in the control group did," Dr. Jocelyn Harris, a researcher with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, said in a news release from the group. "The GRASP patients all did better -- much better."

The study was scheduled to be presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress, meeting June 7 and 8 in Quebec City.

"The power of physical activity to raise the spirits of recovering stroke patients is stronger than anyone suspected," said Harris, who has said she would like to make the GRASP program available beyond the hospital setting.

Dr. Michael Hill, a spokesman for the foundation, acknowledged that people who've had a stroke frequently have symptoms of depression in subsequent weeks. "Depression may be a direct result of the damage to a region of brain and, in addition, the sudden change in ability and life circumstances," he said in the news release.

"It's important to know that depression is treatable," Hill said. "Patients and caregivers should mention depressive symptoms and seek treatment during follow-up visits with their neurologist, internist or family physician."

SOURCES: Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, news release, June 7, 2010 Published on: June 07, 2010