ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Add your Article

After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again

Low-intensity exercise can reduce depression and improve recovery after a stroke, a new study shows.

The finding stems from Canadian research involving 103 people who'd had a stroke and were receiving standard follow-up care in a hospital. About half were then enrolled in an additional experimental effort called the Graded Repetitive Arm Supplementary Program (GRASP).

The GRASP group spent 35 minutes four times a week doing such non-intense arm exercises as buttoning a shirt, pouring water into a glass and playing speed and accuracy games. The functioning of arms and hands that had been affected by the stroke improved, on average, 33 percent for these participants, the study found. The amount that people used their arms and hands increased as well.

"At four weeks, the GRASP patients also reported less depressive symptoms and greater change scores than those in the control group did," Dr. Jocelyn Harris, a researcher with the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, said in a news release from the group. "The GRASP patients all did better -- much better."

The study was scheduled to be presented at the Canadian Stroke Congress, meeting June 7 and 8 in Quebec City.

"The power of physical activity to raise the spirits of recovering stroke patients is stronger than anyone suspected," said Harris, who has said she would like to make the GRASP program available beyond the hospital setting.

Dr. Michael Hill, a spokesman for the foundation, acknowledged that people who've had a stroke frequently have symptoms of depression in subsequent weeks. "Depression may be a direct result of the damage to a region of brain and, in addition, the sudden change in ability and life circumstances," he said in the news release.

"It's important to know that depression is treatable," Hill said. "Patients and caregivers should mention depressive symptoms and seek treatment during follow-up visits with their neurologist, internist or family physician."

SOURCES: Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, news release, June 7, 2010 Published on: June 07, 2010