ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Healthy Living Adds Years to Life
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
More Single Women Are Having Babies
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Add your Article

Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return

THURSDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. male military veterans exposed to the Agent Orange herbicide/defoliant are at increased risk for aggressive recurrence of prostate cancer, a new study finds.

It included 1,495 veterans who'd had surgery to remove cancerous prostates. Of those, the 206 men who'd been exposed to Agent Orange were nearly 50 percent more likely to develop an aggressive recurrence of their cancer, even though their disease seemed relatively non-aggressive at the time of surgery.

The study also found it took only eight months for prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels -- an indicator of cancer aggressiveness -- to double among the Agent Orange-exposed veterans with recurrent cancer, compared to more than 18 months among non-exposed veterans.

The study is published in the May issue of the British Journal of Urology International.

"There is something about the biology of these cancers that are associated with prior Agent Orange exposure that is causing them to be more aggressive. We need to get the word out," study corresponding author Dr. Martha Terris, chief of urology at the Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center in Augusta and professor of urology at the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, said in a school news release.

She said doctors treating prostate cancer patients who've been exposed to Agent Orange need to be aware that these patients may require closer monitoring and so-called salvage therapy quickly if their prostate cancer returns.

"Not only are their recurrence rates higher, but their cancers are coming back and growing much faster when they do come back," Terris said.

There's increasing evidence that exposure to Agent Orange, which was used during the Vietnam War, increases the risk for a number of health problems. Agent Orange contained a known carcinogen called dioxin, which is also found in herbicides and pesticides used by U.S. farmers, according to background information in the news release about the study.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about prostate cancer.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Medical College of Georgia, news release, April 20, 2009

Last Updated: April 23, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.