ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
CANCER
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
A Honey of a Sinusitis Treatment
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return

THURSDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. male military veterans exposed to the Agent Orange herbicide/defoliant are at increased risk for aggressive recurrence of prostate cancer, a new study finds.

It included 1,495 veterans who'd had surgery to remove cancerous prostates. Of those, the 206 men who'd been exposed to Agent Orange were nearly 50 percent more likely to develop an aggressive recurrence of their cancer, even though their disease seemed relatively non-aggressive at the time of surgery.

The study also found it took only eight months for prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels -- an indicator of cancer aggressiveness -- to double among the Agent Orange-exposed veterans with recurrent cancer, compared to more than 18 months among non-exposed veterans.

The study is published in the May issue of the British Journal of Urology International.

"There is something about the biology of these cancers that are associated with prior Agent Orange exposure that is causing them to be more aggressive. We need to get the word out," study corresponding author Dr. Martha Terris, chief of urology at the Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center in Augusta and professor of urology at the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, said in a school news release.

She said doctors treating prostate cancer patients who've been exposed to Agent Orange need to be aware that these patients may require closer monitoring and so-called salvage therapy quickly if their prostate cancer returns.

"Not only are their recurrence rates higher, but their cancers are coming back and growing much faster when they do come back," Terris said.

There's increasing evidence that exposure to Agent Orange, which was used during the Vietnam War, increases the risk for a number of health problems. Agent Orange contained a known carcinogen called dioxin, which is also found in herbicides and pesticides used by U.S. farmers, according to background information in the news release about the study.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about prostate cancer.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Medical College of Georgia, news release, April 20, 2009

Last Updated: April 23, 2009

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