ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Get to Know the Pap Test
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Fatty Acid in Olive Oil Wards Off Hunger
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
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Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return

THURSDAY, April 23 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. male military veterans exposed to the Agent Orange herbicide/defoliant are at increased risk for aggressive recurrence of prostate cancer, a new study finds.

It included 1,495 veterans who'd had surgery to remove cancerous prostates. Of those, the 206 men who'd been exposed to Agent Orange were nearly 50 percent more likely to develop an aggressive recurrence of their cancer, even though their disease seemed relatively non-aggressive at the time of surgery.

The study also found it took only eight months for prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels -- an indicator of cancer aggressiveness -- to double among the Agent Orange-exposed veterans with recurrent cancer, compared to more than 18 months among non-exposed veterans.

The study is published in the May issue of the British Journal of Urology International.

"There is something about the biology of these cancers that are associated with prior Agent Orange exposure that is causing them to be more aggressive. We need to get the word out," study corresponding author Dr. Martha Terris, chief of urology at the Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center in Augusta and professor of urology at the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, said in a school news release.

She said doctors treating prostate cancer patients who've been exposed to Agent Orange need to be aware that these patients may require closer monitoring and so-called salvage therapy quickly if their prostate cancer returns.

"Not only are their recurrence rates higher, but their cancers are coming back and growing much faster when they do come back," Terris said.

There's increasing evidence that exposure to Agent Orange, which was used during the Vietnam War, increases the risk for a number of health problems. Agent Orange contained a known carcinogen called dioxin, which is also found in herbicides and pesticides used by U.S. farmers, according to background information in the news release about the study.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about prostate cancer.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Medical College of Georgia, news release, April 20, 2009

Last Updated: April 23, 2009

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