ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
CANCER
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
FITNESS
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Any Old Cane Won't Do
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar

TUESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- More than 1 billion people worldwide had age-related farsightedness -- called presbyopia -- in 2005.

And about 410 million of those people were unable to perform tasks that required near vision, according to researchers who predicted that global cases of presbyopia will increase to 1.4 billion by 2020 and 1.8 billion by 2050.

Presbyopia occurs as lenses in aging eyes lose elasticity and the ability to focus on close objects. The condition typically requires older people to use reading glasses, for instance.

"Although known physiology and population demographics suggest that presbyopia is common or nearly universal in people older than 65 years, direct estimates of prevalence are rare," Brien A. Holden, of the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, and colleagues noted in the study. "The total number of people with presbyopia is primarily of interest as a precursor to the figures of greatest public health interest: the number of people with impaired vision due to uncorrected or undercorrected presbyopia and the effect on their lives."

The researchers analyzed multiple surveys and concluded that 1.04 billion people worldwide had presbyopia in 2005 and that 517 million had no eyeglasses or inadequate eyeglasses. Of the 517 million people whose daily tasks were impaired by uncorrected presbyopia, 386 million (94 percent) lived in developing nations.

Holden and his colleagues also used the International Data Base of the U.S. Census Bureau to predict future rates of presbyopia and presbyopia-related disability.

"Without intervention to make [eyeglasses] more accessible, the global number of individuals who will have a disability associated with uncorrected presbyopia is predicted to grow to 563 million people by 2020," the researchers wrote. "If the goal of Vision 2020 to eliminate unnecessary blindness and impaired vision, in this case due to uncorrected refractive error, is to be achieved, planning will have to include the provision of human resources, affordable [eyeglasses] and systems of delivery for these half-billion people in need."

The study was published in the December issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

More information

The American Optometric Association has more about presbyopia.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 09, 2008

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