ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Internet Program Helps Problem Drinkers
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
What you need to know about swine flu.
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar

TUESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- More than 1 billion people worldwide had age-related farsightedness -- called presbyopia -- in 2005.

And about 410 million of those people were unable to perform tasks that required near vision, according to researchers who predicted that global cases of presbyopia will increase to 1.4 billion by 2020 and 1.8 billion by 2050.

Presbyopia occurs as lenses in aging eyes lose elasticity and the ability to focus on close objects. The condition typically requires older people to use reading glasses, for instance.

"Although known physiology and population demographics suggest that presbyopia is common or nearly universal in people older than 65 years, direct estimates of prevalence are rare," Brien A. Holden, of the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, and colleagues noted in the study. "The total number of people with presbyopia is primarily of interest as a precursor to the figures of greatest public health interest: the number of people with impaired vision due to uncorrected or undercorrected presbyopia and the effect on their lives."

The researchers analyzed multiple surveys and concluded that 1.04 billion people worldwide had presbyopia in 2005 and that 517 million had no eyeglasses or inadequate eyeglasses. Of the 517 million people whose daily tasks were impaired by uncorrected presbyopia, 386 million (94 percent) lived in developing nations.

Holden and his colleagues also used the International Data Base of the U.S. Census Bureau to predict future rates of presbyopia and presbyopia-related disability.

"Without intervention to make [eyeglasses] more accessible, the global number of individuals who will have a disability associated with uncorrected presbyopia is predicted to grow to 563 million people by 2020," the researchers wrote. "If the goal of Vision 2020 to eliminate unnecessary blindness and impaired vision, in this case due to uncorrected refractive error, is to be achieved, planning will have to include the provision of human resources, affordable [eyeglasses] and systems of delivery for these half-billion people in need."

The study was published in the December issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

More information

The American Optometric Association has more about presbyopia.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 09, 2008

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