ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Eat Light - Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Add your Article

Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth

WEDNESDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may slow the normal growth of a developing fetus, a U.S. study has found.

Researchers looked at data on nearly 336,000 births in New Jersey between 1999 and 2003 and at daily air pollution readings from across the state. Readings from monitoring sites within six miles of the mothers' homes were used to calculate average levels of air pollution during their pregnancies.

The study found that the risk of a small birth-weight baby increased significantly with each increase in particulate matter of 4 micrograms per cubic meter during the first and third trimesters of pregnancy. Each 10 parts per billion increase in nitrogen oxide exposure was also associated with a large increase in the risk of a small birth-weight baby.

The findings suggest that traffic pollution or living close to a major road could be linked to restricted fetal growth, said David Rich and colleagues from the department of epidemiology at the School of Public Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, in Piscataway, N.J.

They also found that exposure to particulate matter in later pregnancy was associated with a two- to fivefold increased risk of restricted fetal growth among mothers with separation of the placenta before birth and premature rupture of the membrane, compared with mothers who did not have these complications.

The findings were published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

It's not clear exactly how air pollution affects fetal growth, the researchers said. They noted that previous research found that air pollution might alter cell activity or reduce the amount of oxygen and nutrients received by a fetus.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about air pollution and health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: BMJ Specialist Journals, news release, April 9, 2009

Last Updated: April 09, 2009

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