ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
CAREGIVING
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
Eat Light - Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth

WEDNESDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may slow the normal growth of a developing fetus, a U.S. study has found.

Researchers looked at data on nearly 336,000 births in New Jersey between 1999 and 2003 and at daily air pollution readings from across the state. Readings from monitoring sites within six miles of the mothers' homes were used to calculate average levels of air pollution during their pregnancies.

The study found that the risk of a small birth-weight baby increased significantly with each increase in particulate matter of 4 micrograms per cubic meter during the first and third trimesters of pregnancy. Each 10 parts per billion increase in nitrogen oxide exposure was also associated with a large increase in the risk of a small birth-weight baby.

The findings suggest that traffic pollution or living close to a major road could be linked to restricted fetal growth, said David Rich and colleagues from the department of epidemiology at the School of Public Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, in Piscataway, N.J.

They also found that exposure to particulate matter in later pregnancy was associated with a two- to fivefold increased risk of restricted fetal growth among mothers with separation of the placenta before birth and premature rupture of the membrane, compared with mothers who did not have these complications.

The findings were published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

It's not clear exactly how air pollution affects fetal growth, the researchers said. They noted that previous research found that air pollution might alter cell activity or reduce the amount of oxygen and nutrients received by a fetus.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about air pollution and health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: BMJ Specialist Journals, news release, April 9, 2009

Last Updated: April 09, 2009

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