ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
CANCER
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
CAREGIVING
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health?
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
FITNESS
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
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Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure

(HealthDay News) -- Breathing polluted air for even two hours can boost blood pressure, potentially raising the risk of cardiovascular disease in those exposed to smog, a new study suggests.

Although the increase may not mean much for healthy people, "this small increase may actually be able to a trigger a heart attack or stroke," study author Dr. Robert D. Brook, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan, said in a university news release.

An estimated nearly one in three Americans suffer from high blood pressure, meaning the heart is straining to push blood through the circulatory system.

In the study, which appears in a recent issue of Hypertension, researchers tested 83 people as they breathed levels of air pollution similar to those in an urban city near a roadway.

"We looked at their blood vessels and then their responses before and after breathing high levels of air pollution," study co-author Robert Bard, a University of Michigan clinic research coordinator, said in a news release.

The air pollution caused diastolic pressure -- the lower number in a blood pressure reading -- to rise within two hours. Blood vessels were impaired for as long as 24 hours.

Tests showed that microscopic particles in the air, rather than ozone gases, caused the rise in blood pressure and impaired blood vessel function.

"If air pollution levels are forecasted to be high, those with heart disease, diabetes or lung disease should avoid unnecessary outdoor activity," Brook said.

SOURCES: University of Michigan, news release, September 2009 Published on: September 14, 2009