ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Eat Light - Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
A Honey of a Sinusitis Treatment
Internet Program Helps Problem Drinkers
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
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Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure

(HealthDay News) -- Breathing polluted air for even two hours can boost blood pressure, potentially raising the risk of cardiovascular disease in those exposed to smog, a new study suggests.

Although the increase may not mean much for healthy people, "this small increase may actually be able to a trigger a heart attack or stroke," study author Dr. Robert D. Brook, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan, said in a university news release.

An estimated nearly one in three Americans suffer from high blood pressure, meaning the heart is straining to push blood through the circulatory system.

In the study, which appears in a recent issue of Hypertension, researchers tested 83 people as they breathed levels of air pollution similar to those in an urban city near a roadway.

"We looked at their blood vessels and then their responses before and after breathing high levels of air pollution," study co-author Robert Bard, a University of Michigan clinic research coordinator, said in a news release.

The air pollution caused diastolic pressure -- the lower number in a blood pressure reading -- to rise within two hours. Blood vessels were impaired for as long as 24 hours.

Tests showed that microscopic particles in the air, rather than ozone gases, caused the rise in blood pressure and impaired blood vessel function.

"If air pollution levels are forecasted to be high, those with heart disease, diabetes or lung disease should avoid unnecessary outdoor activity," Brook said.

SOURCES: University of Michigan, news release, September 2009 Published on: September 14, 2009