ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
The Raw Food Diet
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
FITNESS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
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Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones

THURSDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol disrupts genes needed to maintain healthy bones, which can lead to a decrease in bone mass and bone strength, a new study says.

In previous research, the study authors, from Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, showed that giving rats large amounts of alcohol caused significant decreases in bone density and bone strength, but the mechanisms responsible for these effects weren't clear.

In this new study, rats were injected with an amount of alcohol equivalent to binge drinking for three days or chronic alcohol abuse for four weeks in humans. When they examined genes responsible for bone health, the researchers found that alcohol affected the amounts of RNA associated with these genes. RNA acts as the template for making proteins, the building blocks of bones and other tissue.

Alcohol increased the amount of RNA associated with some genes and decreased the amount of RNA associated with other genes. These changes in RNA disrupted two molecular pathways -- the Wnt signaling pathway and the Intergrin signaling pathway -- responsible for normal bone metabolism and bone mass maintenance, the researchers said.

The findings, published recently in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, could help in the development of new drugs to minimize bone loss in people who abuse alcohol. Such drugs also might help people at risk for osteoporosis.

"Of course, the best way to prevent alcohol-induced bone loss is to not drink or to drink moderately. But when prevention doesn't work, we need other strategies to limit the damage," study co-author and bone biologist John Callaci, as assistant professor in the department of orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation, said in a Loyola news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about bone health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Loyola University, news release, Oct. 23, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 06, 2008

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