ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
CANCER
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
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Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones

THURSDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol disrupts genes needed to maintain healthy bones, which can lead to a decrease in bone mass and bone strength, a new study says.

In previous research, the study authors, from Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, showed that giving rats large amounts of alcohol caused significant decreases in bone density and bone strength, but the mechanisms responsible for these effects weren't clear.

In this new study, rats were injected with an amount of alcohol equivalent to binge drinking for three days or chronic alcohol abuse for four weeks in humans. When they examined genes responsible for bone health, the researchers found that alcohol affected the amounts of RNA associated with these genes. RNA acts as the template for making proteins, the building blocks of bones and other tissue.

Alcohol increased the amount of RNA associated with some genes and decreased the amount of RNA associated with other genes. These changes in RNA disrupted two molecular pathways -- the Wnt signaling pathway and the Intergrin signaling pathway -- responsible for normal bone metabolism and bone mass maintenance, the researchers said.

The findings, published recently in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, could help in the development of new drugs to minimize bone loss in people who abuse alcohol. Such drugs also might help people at risk for osteoporosis.

"Of course, the best way to prevent alcohol-induced bone loss is to not drink or to drink moderately. But when prevention doesn't work, we need other strategies to limit the damage," study co-author and bone biologist John Callaci, as assistant professor in the department of orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation, said in a Loyola news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about bone health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Loyola University, news release, Oct. 23, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 06, 2008

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