ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Free Range
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
FITNESS
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones

THURSDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol disrupts genes needed to maintain healthy bones, which can lead to a decrease in bone mass and bone strength, a new study says.

In previous research, the study authors, from Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, showed that giving rats large amounts of alcohol caused significant decreases in bone density and bone strength, but the mechanisms responsible for these effects weren't clear.

In this new study, rats were injected with an amount of alcohol equivalent to binge drinking for three days or chronic alcohol abuse for four weeks in humans. When they examined genes responsible for bone health, the researchers found that alcohol affected the amounts of RNA associated with these genes. RNA acts as the template for making proteins, the building blocks of bones and other tissue.

Alcohol increased the amount of RNA associated with some genes and decreased the amount of RNA associated with other genes. These changes in RNA disrupted two molecular pathways -- the Wnt signaling pathway and the Intergrin signaling pathway -- responsible for normal bone metabolism and bone mass maintenance, the researchers said.

The findings, published recently in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, could help in the development of new drugs to minimize bone loss in people who abuse alcohol. Such drugs also might help people at risk for osteoporosis.

"Of course, the best way to prevent alcohol-induced bone loss is to not drink or to drink moderately. But when prevention doesn't work, we need other strategies to limit the damage," study co-author and bone biologist John Callaci, as assistant professor in the department of orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation, said in a Loyola news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about bone health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Loyola University, news release, Oct. 23, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 06, 2008

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