ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
After Job Loss, People Report More Health Issues
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
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Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones

THURSDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol disrupts genes needed to maintain healthy bones, which can lead to a decrease in bone mass and bone strength, a new study says.

In previous research, the study authors, from Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, showed that giving rats large amounts of alcohol caused significant decreases in bone density and bone strength, but the mechanisms responsible for these effects weren't clear.

In this new study, rats were injected with an amount of alcohol equivalent to binge drinking for three days or chronic alcohol abuse for four weeks in humans. When they examined genes responsible for bone health, the researchers found that alcohol affected the amounts of RNA associated with these genes. RNA acts as the template for making proteins, the building blocks of bones and other tissue.

Alcohol increased the amount of RNA associated with some genes and decreased the amount of RNA associated with other genes. These changes in RNA disrupted two molecular pathways -- the Wnt signaling pathway and the Intergrin signaling pathway -- responsible for normal bone metabolism and bone mass maintenance, the researchers said.

The findings, published recently in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, could help in the development of new drugs to minimize bone loss in people who abuse alcohol. Such drugs also might help people at risk for osteoporosis.

"Of course, the best way to prevent alcohol-induced bone loss is to not drink or to drink moderately. But when prevention doesn't work, we need other strategies to limit the damage," study co-author and bone biologist John Callaci, as assistant professor in the department of orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation, said in a Loyola news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about bone health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Loyola University, news release, Oct. 23, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 06, 2008

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