ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Healthy Living Adds Years to Life
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Natural Therapies for Menopause
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Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Almost half of all American adults will develop osteoarthritis of the knee by age 85, and their odds increase if they are obese in middle age, a new study says.

A person's risk of having the painful condition increased as his or her body-mass index (BMI) rose, according to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study. People who were of normal weight at age 18 but were overweight or obese by 45 or older had the greatest risk.

"These results show how important weight management is for people throughout their lives," senior study author Joanne Jordan, principal investigator of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, said in a university news release. "Simply put, people who keep their weight within the normal range are much less likely to develop symptomatic knee osteoarthritis as they get older and thus much less likely to face the need for major surgical procedures, such as knee replacement surgery."

The study, published in the Sept. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research, was based on analyzing data collected from more than 3,000 North Carolinians over a 13-year period. Participants were interviewed and given a clinical exam, including knee X-rays and BMI measurements.

Obese people had a significantly higher lifetime risk, 64.5 percent versus 34.9 percent for normal weight and 44.1 percent for overweight participants. Those with prior knee injuries in their lifetime also had a higher risk than those without (56.8 percent vs. 42.3 percent).

No notable risk differences were found based on a participant's sex, race or education level.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about osteoarthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, Sept. 2, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 05, 2008

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