ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
FITNESS
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Healthy Living Adds Years to Life
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
The Unmedicated Mind
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
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Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Almost half of all American adults will develop osteoarthritis of the knee by age 85, and their odds increase if they are obese in middle age, a new study says.

A person's risk of having the painful condition increased as his or her body-mass index (BMI) rose, according to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study. People who were of normal weight at age 18 but were overweight or obese by 45 or older had the greatest risk.

"These results show how important weight management is for people throughout their lives," senior study author Joanne Jordan, principal investigator of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, said in a university news release. "Simply put, people who keep their weight within the normal range are much less likely to develop symptomatic knee osteoarthritis as they get older and thus much less likely to face the need for major surgical procedures, such as knee replacement surgery."

The study, published in the Sept. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research, was based on analyzing data collected from more than 3,000 North Carolinians over a 13-year period. Participants were interviewed and given a clinical exam, including knee X-rays and BMI measurements.

Obese people had a significantly higher lifetime risk, 64.5 percent versus 34.9 percent for normal weight and 44.1 percent for overweight participants. Those with prior knee injuries in their lifetime also had a higher risk than those without (56.8 percent vs. 42.3 percent).

No notable risk differences were found based on a participant's sex, race or education level.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about osteoarthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, Sept. 2, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 05, 2008

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