ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
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Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Almost half of all American adults will develop osteoarthritis of the knee by age 85, and their odds increase if they are obese in middle age, a new study says.

A person's risk of having the painful condition increased as his or her body-mass index (BMI) rose, according to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study. People who were of normal weight at age 18 but were overweight or obese by 45 or older had the greatest risk.

"These results show how important weight management is for people throughout their lives," senior study author Joanne Jordan, principal investigator of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, said in a university news release. "Simply put, people who keep their weight within the normal range are much less likely to develop symptomatic knee osteoarthritis as they get older and thus much less likely to face the need for major surgical procedures, such as knee replacement surgery."

The study, published in the Sept. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research, was based on analyzing data collected from more than 3,000 North Carolinians over a 13-year period. Participants were interviewed and given a clinical exam, including knee X-rays and BMI measurements.

Obese people had a significantly higher lifetime risk, 64.5 percent versus 34.9 percent for normal weight and 44.1 percent for overweight participants. Those with prior knee injuries in their lifetime also had a higher risk than those without (56.8 percent vs. 42.3 percent).

No notable risk differences were found based on a participant's sex, race or education level.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about osteoarthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, Sept. 2, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 05, 2008

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