ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
EYE CARE, VISION
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Maximize Your Run
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Add your Article

Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines

THURSDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 65 percent of people in the United States last year met the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. And 49 percent of those people met the Healthy People 2010 physical activity objectives, according to a federal report released Thursday.

According to the 2008 guidelines, released in October by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the minimum recommended aerobic physical activity required to produce substantial health benefits in adults is 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity per week, or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous physical activity. In addition, muscle-strengthening exercises are recommended at least twice a week.

The 2010 guidelines call for adults to do at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity five days per week, or 20 minutes of vigorous activity three days a week.

For this study, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers analyzed data from 399,107 adults aged 18 and older who took part in the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. The 64.5 percent of respondents who met the 2008 guidelines included 68.9 percent of men and 60.4 percent of women. By age group, the percentage classified as physically active ranged from 51.2 percent of those older than 65, to 74 percent of those ages 18 to 24.

Among racial/ethnic groups, rates were lower for non-Hispanic blacks (56.5 percent) than for non-Hispanic whites (67.5 percent). By education levels, rates were lowest for those with less than a high school diploma (52.2 percent) and highest for college graduates (70.3 percent). By region, rates were lowest in the South (62.3 percent) and highest in the West (67.8 percent). The study also found that 68.8 percent of normal weight people were physically active, compared with 67.3 percent of those who were overweight and 57.1 percent of those who were obese.

The 48 percent of respondents who met the Healthy People 2010 objectives included 50.7 percent of men and 47 percent of women.

The study was published in the Dec. 5 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a publication of the CDC.

In the BRFSS survey, moderate physical activity was assessed by asking respondents, "When you are not working, in a usual week, do you do moderate activities for at least 10 minutes at a time, such as brisk walking, bicycling, vacuuming, gardening, or anything else that causes some increase in breathing or heart rate?"

Those who answered yes were then asked, "How many days per week do you do these moderate activities for at least 10 minutes at a time?" Finally, they were asked, "On days when you do moderate activities for at least 10 minutes at a time, how much total time per day do you spend doing these activities?"

To assess participation in vigorous-intensity activities, respondents were asked, "When you are not working, in a usual week, do you do vigorous activities for at least 10 minutes at a time, such as running, aerobics, heavy yard work, or anything else that causes large increases in breathing or heart rate?"

Those who answered yes were then asked, "How many days per week do you do these vigorous activities for at least 10 minutes at a time?" Finally, they were asked, "On days when you do vigorous activities for at least 10 minutes at a time, how much total time per day do you spend doing these activities?"

More information

Here's where you can find the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Dec. 5, 2008, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta

Last Updated: Dec. 04, 2008

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