ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
CANCER
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Add your Article

Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines

THURSDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 65 percent of people in the United States last year met the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. And 49 percent of those people met the Healthy People 2010 physical activity objectives, according to a federal report released Thursday.

According to the 2008 guidelines, released in October by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the minimum recommended aerobic physical activity required to produce substantial health benefits in adults is 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity per week, or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous physical activity. In addition, muscle-strengthening exercises are recommended at least twice a week.

The 2010 guidelines call for adults to do at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity five days per week, or 20 minutes of vigorous activity three days a week.

For this study, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers analyzed data from 399,107 adults aged 18 and older who took part in the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. The 64.5 percent of respondents who met the 2008 guidelines included 68.9 percent of men and 60.4 percent of women. By age group, the percentage classified as physically active ranged from 51.2 percent of those older than 65, to 74 percent of those ages 18 to 24.

Among racial/ethnic groups, rates were lower for non-Hispanic blacks (56.5 percent) than for non-Hispanic whites (67.5 percent). By education levels, rates were lowest for those with less than a high school diploma (52.2 percent) and highest for college graduates (70.3 percent). By region, rates were lowest in the South (62.3 percent) and highest in the West (67.8 percent). The study also found that 68.8 percent of normal weight people were physically active, compared with 67.3 percent of those who were overweight and 57.1 percent of those who were obese.

The 48 percent of respondents who met the Healthy People 2010 objectives included 50.7 percent of men and 47 percent of women.

The study was published in the Dec. 5 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a publication of the CDC.

In the BRFSS survey, moderate physical activity was assessed by asking respondents, "When you are not working, in a usual week, do you do moderate activities for at least 10 minutes at a time, such as brisk walking, bicycling, vacuuming, gardening, or anything else that causes some increase in breathing or heart rate?"

Those who answered yes were then asked, "How many days per week do you do these moderate activities for at least 10 minutes at a time?" Finally, they were asked, "On days when you do moderate activities for at least 10 minutes at a time, how much total time per day do you spend doing these activities?"

To assess participation in vigorous-intensity activities, respondents were asked, "When you are not working, in a usual week, do you do vigorous activities for at least 10 minutes at a time, such as running, aerobics, heavy yard work, or anything else that causes large increases in breathing or heart rate?"

Those who answered yes were then asked, "How many days per week do you do these vigorous activities for at least 10 minutes at a time?" Finally, they were asked, "On days when you do vigorous activities for at least 10 minutes at a time, how much total time per day do you spend doing these activities?"

More information

Here's where you can find the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Dec. 5, 2008, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta

Last Updated: Dec. 04, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com