ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Winter Is Tough on Feet
CANCER
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
The Food Irradiation Story
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
FITNESS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Tune Up Your Health With Music
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Add your Article

Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success

(HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that mind-body treatment can boost the odds that infertile women will become pregnant by in vitro fertilization -- at least after more than one cycle.

Dr. Alice Domar, who specializes in mind-body therapy in Boston, assigned one group of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) to take part in 10 sessions of a mind-body program; another group undergoing IVF did not take part. There was no difference in pregnancy rates between the two groups.

But things changed during the next cycle of IVF treatments. Then, 52 percent of the women who took part in the mind-body program became pregnant, compared with 20 percent of those in the other group.

Mind-body sessions appeared to be especially helpful for women who were more depressed, judging from test scores, the study found.

"It's clear, based on this carefully designed study, that a holistic approach to infertility care leads to better outcomes for patients," Dr. R. Dale McClure, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said in a news release from the organization.

In a related study, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, surveyed 431 infertile couples undergoing treatment and found that 28 percent had tried complementary and alternative medical therapy. Acupuncture was the most common approach (22 percent had tried it), followed by herbal therapies (17 percent) and body work (5 percent).

Wealthier people were most likely to have tried the alternative therapies, the study found.

A similar study from New York researchers found that even more of the couples tried alternative therapies: 47 percent. Of them, more than 90 percent called the therapy effective.

The studies were scheduled to be released at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine annual meeting, Oct. 17-21 in Atlanta.

SOURCES: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 19, 2009