ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Add your Article

Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success

(HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that mind-body treatment can boost the odds that infertile women will become pregnant by in vitro fertilization -- at least after more than one cycle.

Dr. Alice Domar, who specializes in mind-body therapy in Boston, assigned one group of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) to take part in 10 sessions of a mind-body program; another group undergoing IVF did not take part. There was no difference in pregnancy rates between the two groups.

But things changed during the next cycle of IVF treatments. Then, 52 percent of the women who took part in the mind-body program became pregnant, compared with 20 percent of those in the other group.

Mind-body sessions appeared to be especially helpful for women who were more depressed, judging from test scores, the study found.

"It's clear, based on this carefully designed study, that a holistic approach to infertility care leads to better outcomes for patients," Dr. R. Dale McClure, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said in a news release from the organization.

In a related study, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, surveyed 431 infertile couples undergoing treatment and found that 28 percent had tried complementary and alternative medical therapy. Acupuncture was the most common approach (22 percent had tried it), followed by herbal therapies (17 percent) and body work (5 percent).

Wealthier people were most likely to have tried the alternative therapies, the study found.

A similar study from New York researchers found that even more of the couples tried alternative therapies: 47 percent. Of them, more than 90 percent called the therapy effective.

The studies were scheduled to be released at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine annual meeting, Oct. 17-21 in Atlanta.

SOURCES: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 19, 2009