ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
CANCER
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
CAREGIVING
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
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Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success

(HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that mind-body treatment can boost the odds that infertile women will become pregnant by in vitro fertilization -- at least after more than one cycle.

Dr. Alice Domar, who specializes in mind-body therapy in Boston, assigned one group of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) to take part in 10 sessions of a mind-body program; another group undergoing IVF did not take part. There was no difference in pregnancy rates between the two groups.

But things changed during the next cycle of IVF treatments. Then, 52 percent of the women who took part in the mind-body program became pregnant, compared with 20 percent of those in the other group.

Mind-body sessions appeared to be especially helpful for women who were more depressed, judging from test scores, the study found.

"It's clear, based on this carefully designed study, that a holistic approach to infertility care leads to better outcomes for patients," Dr. R. Dale McClure, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said in a news release from the organization.

In a related study, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, surveyed 431 infertile couples undergoing treatment and found that 28 percent had tried complementary and alternative medical therapy. Acupuncture was the most common approach (22 percent had tried it), followed by herbal therapies (17 percent) and body work (5 percent).

Wealthier people were most likely to have tried the alternative therapies, the study found.

A similar study from New York researchers found that even more of the couples tried alternative therapies: 47 percent. Of them, more than 90 percent called the therapy effective.

The studies were scheduled to be released at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine annual meeting, Oct. 17-21 in Atlanta.

SOURCES: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 19, 2009