ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
CANCER
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Fatty Acid in Olive Oil Wards Off Hunger
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success

(HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that mind-body treatment can boost the odds that infertile women will become pregnant by in vitro fertilization -- at least after more than one cycle.

Dr. Alice Domar, who specializes in mind-body therapy in Boston, assigned one group of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) to take part in 10 sessions of a mind-body program; another group undergoing IVF did not take part. There was no difference in pregnancy rates between the two groups.

But things changed during the next cycle of IVF treatments. Then, 52 percent of the women who took part in the mind-body program became pregnant, compared with 20 percent of those in the other group.

Mind-body sessions appeared to be especially helpful for women who were more depressed, judging from test scores, the study found.

"It's clear, based on this carefully designed study, that a holistic approach to infertility care leads to better outcomes for patients," Dr. R. Dale McClure, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said in a news release from the organization.

In a related study, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, surveyed 431 infertile couples undergoing treatment and found that 28 percent had tried complementary and alternative medical therapy. Acupuncture was the most common approach (22 percent had tried it), followed by herbal therapies (17 percent) and body work (5 percent).

Wealthier people were most likely to have tried the alternative therapies, the study found.

A similar study from New York researchers found that even more of the couples tried alternative therapies: 47 percent. Of them, more than 90 percent called the therapy effective.

The studies were scheduled to be released at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine annual meeting, Oct. 17-21 in Atlanta.

SOURCES: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 19, 2009