ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
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Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success

(HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that mind-body treatment can boost the odds that infertile women will become pregnant by in vitro fertilization -- at least after more than one cycle.

Dr. Alice Domar, who specializes in mind-body therapy in Boston, assigned one group of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) to take part in 10 sessions of a mind-body program; another group undergoing IVF did not take part. There was no difference in pregnancy rates between the two groups.

But things changed during the next cycle of IVF treatments. Then, 52 percent of the women who took part in the mind-body program became pregnant, compared with 20 percent of those in the other group.

Mind-body sessions appeared to be especially helpful for women who were more depressed, judging from test scores, the study found.

"It's clear, based on this carefully designed study, that a holistic approach to infertility care leads to better outcomes for patients," Dr. R. Dale McClure, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said in a news release from the organization.

In a related study, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, surveyed 431 infertile couples undergoing treatment and found that 28 percent had tried complementary and alternative medical therapy. Acupuncture was the most common approach (22 percent had tried it), followed by herbal therapies (17 percent) and body work (5 percent).

Wealthier people were most likely to have tried the alternative therapies, the study found.

A similar study from New York researchers found that even more of the couples tried alternative therapies: 47 percent. Of them, more than 90 percent called the therapy effective.

The studies were scheduled to be released at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine annual meeting, Oct. 17-21 in Atlanta.

SOURCES: American Society for Reproductive Medicine, news release, Oct. 19, 2009