ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
Kids More Apt to Smoke If Mom Did While Pregnant
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Add your Article

15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a 15-point test that can identify the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease in older people.

But the tool, which involves both simple questions as well as complex physiological testing, may not be practical for clinical use.

"Some of the points on there are fairly easy, such as age and mental status exams. We do those already in the clinic," said Dr. Michael Palm, an assistant professor of neuroscience and experimental therapeutics and internal medicine at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. "But, as far as the screening tests, I don't think we can order MRI and genetic testing on everybody who starts getting older."

And the simpler parts of the system, Palm added, are already routinely used in screening for Alzheimer's.

Palm was not involved with the study, conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, and published online May 13 issue in the journal Neurology.

According to the authors of the study, which was supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, while there are ways to predict dementia two decades in the future in middle-aged individuals, there is no system to predict onset of the disease later in life.

The study involved 3,375 people, mean age 76, none of whom had dementia when they were enrolled. About 60 percent were women, and 15 percent were black.

Risk factors in the index included: older age; poor performance on cognitive tests; low body-mass index; having the predisposing apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene; abnormal MRI findings; thicker carotid artery measurements and other vascular indications; slowness buttoning a shirt or performing other physical tasks; and not drinking alcohol.

Only 4 percent of participants with low scores went on to develop dementia (Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia including vascular dementia) over the next six years, versus 23 percent of those with mid-range scores and 56 percent of those with high scores.

Not surprisingly, older age and poorer performance on cognitive tests were the strongest indicators of future dementia.

Other risk factors were more surprising, said Dr. Gary Kennedy, director of geriatric psychiatry at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Those included lower body-mass index and abstaining from alcohol, which contradict previous findings.

Still, Kennedy agreed with Palm when he pointed out that some aspects of the tool are not likely to be adopted on a large scale, such as an MRI.

More information

The Alzheimer's Association has more on risk factors for this disease.



SOURCES: Gary J. Kennedy, M.D., director, geriatric psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center, New York City; Michael Palm, M.D., assistant professor, neuroscience and experimental therapeutics and internal medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and director, Parkinson's and Headache programs, Texas Brain and Spine Institute, Bryan; May 13, 2009, Neurology, online

Last Updated: May 13, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com