ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
EYE CARE, VISION
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Add your Article

Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- If you're like many Americans, soda and coffee drinks have become a staple of your daily diet.

But the findings from a new study may make you drop that super-sized, sweetened beverage.

Published in the January issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the research found that people are now drinking almost 50 additional calories of sweetened beverages daily compared to two decades ago, for an average of about 300 calories daily coming from such drinks. So, even if you have the exact same diet as you did 20 years ago and your activity level hasn't changed, those seemingly harmless 50 extra daily calories could cause you to pack on an additional five pounds every year.

"People are taking in enormous amounts of calories in liquid form," said study author Sara Bleich, an assistant professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. "If you're looking for an easy way to lose weight, just stop drinking soda and other sweetened beverages."

Cutting 300 liquid calories from your daily diet translates into about a 2.5 pound weight loss each month.

For the study, Bleich and her colleagues compared data from two national surveys that are part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). One survey covered 1988 to 1994, and the other ran from 1999 to 2004.

The first study included 15,979 adults over age 20, and the second included 13,431 U.S. adults. All completed 24-hour dietary recall information, including whether or not they had consumed a sugar-sweetened beverage. For the study, sugar-sweetened beverages included soda, sport drinks, fruit drinks, punches, low-calorie drinks, sweetened tea and other sweetened drinks.

The percentage of adults who drank sugar-sweetened beverages increased from 58 percent to 63 percent, and the average daily caloric intake from sugar-sweetened drinks increased by 46 calories a day, according to the researchers.

Young adults drank far more calories from sugar-sweetened beverages than did the elderly, with young blacks consuming the highest percentage of sugar-sweetened beverages.

The researchers also found that overweight adults who were trying to lose weight were less likely to drink sugar-sweetened beverages, yet still consumed an average of 278 calories a day during the second study period.

"U.S. adults are consuming a very large amount of sugar-sweetened beverages, and it has increased over time," said Bleich. "I think there are two main drivers to the increase: One is availability. Sugar-sweetened beverages are everywhere. And, two, the container size has increased, so that on any given consumption occasion, people are drinking more."

"Everyone is definitely used to super-sizing," said registered dietician Samantha Heller, host of the satellite radio program, The Samantha Heller Health and Nutrition Show on the NYU Langone Medical Center's Doctor Radio. "If you look at old 8-ounce Coke bottles, they look tiny, but a 20-ounce bottle looks normal."

"One 12-ounce can of soda has about 10 teaspoons of sugar, and most people are drinking more than 12 ounces," she added.

Heller said that she realizes it can be hard to make a change. "When you drink something that tastes good and gives you an energy boost, it's awfully hard to make a connection between those feelings and the fact that those drinks can contribute to overweight, obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease."

Still, she advised, "You need to limit your daily intake of sugar-sweetened beverages. To give yourself an incentive, take the money you would've spent on those drinks and put it in a jar, and in a couple of months, buy something fun for yourself or your family."

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers information on evaluating the calorie content of foods and beverages.



SOURCES: Sara Bleich, Ph.D., assistant professor, health policy and management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore; Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D., host, satellite radio program, The Samantha Heller Health and Nutrition Show on NYU Langone Medical Center's Doctor Radio; January 2009, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Last Updated: Jan. 09, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com