ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Even in 'Last Supper,' Portion Sizes Have Grown
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
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Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease

(HealthDay News) -- Eating plenty of antioxidant-rich food such as blueberries, artichokes and pecans may help protect against macular degeneration, the leading cause of age-related blindness in the United States and other developed countries.

U.S. researchers found that antioxidants disrupt a link between two processes in the retina that, in combination, contribute to macular degeneration. Antioxidants also extend the lifetime of irreplaceable photoreceptors and other retinal cells.

The "destructive synergy" that causes macular degeneration occurs when a buildup of a compound called A2E disrupts energy production in mitochondria, the "power plants" in cells, the researchers said. The lack of energy interferes with daily cleaning and maintenance of photoreceptors and another type of retinal cell. This leads to more buildup of A2E and a continuing cycle that results in the destruction of the vital visual cells that can't be replaced.

Experiments using visual cells from humans, rats and cows showed that antioxidants could completely counter the damage caused by this process, said the researchers from Brigham Young University and Weill Medical College of Cornell University.

"The implication is that people at risk of macular degeneration could help prevent the disease by consuming antioxidants," study author Heidi Vollmer-Snarr, a Brigham Young chemist, said in a university news release.

The study was published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

"This work by Dr. Vollmer-Snarr and colleagues ties these two damaging processes together and demonstrates the harm they cause in combination is much more than would be expected," Dr. Paul Bernstein, of the University of Utah's Moran Eye Center, said in the news release. "This new knowledge," added Bernstein, who wasn't involved in the study, "suggests the possibility of interventions which could prove to be powerful ways to prevent or delay age-related macular degeneration."

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more about age-related macular degeneration.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Brigham Young University, news release, Aug. 19, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 29, 2008

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