ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Winter Is Tough on Feet
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
The Raw Food Diet
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Tune Up Your Health With Music
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
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Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease

(HealthDay News) -- Eating plenty of antioxidant-rich food such as blueberries, artichokes and pecans may help protect against macular degeneration, the leading cause of age-related blindness in the United States and other developed countries.

U.S. researchers found that antioxidants disrupt a link between two processes in the retina that, in combination, contribute to macular degeneration. Antioxidants also extend the lifetime of irreplaceable photoreceptors and other retinal cells.

The "destructive synergy" that causes macular degeneration occurs when a buildup of a compound called A2E disrupts energy production in mitochondria, the "power plants" in cells, the researchers said. The lack of energy interferes with daily cleaning and maintenance of photoreceptors and another type of retinal cell. This leads to more buildup of A2E and a continuing cycle that results in the destruction of the vital visual cells that can't be replaced.

Experiments using visual cells from humans, rats and cows showed that antioxidants could completely counter the damage caused by this process, said the researchers from Brigham Young University and Weill Medical College of Cornell University.

"The implication is that people at risk of macular degeneration could help prevent the disease by consuming antioxidants," study author Heidi Vollmer-Snarr, a Brigham Young chemist, said in a university news release.

The study was published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

"This work by Dr. Vollmer-Snarr and colleagues ties these two damaging processes together and demonstrates the harm they cause in combination is much more than would be expected," Dr. Paul Bernstein, of the University of Utah's Moran Eye Center, said in the news release. "This new knowledge," added Bernstein, who wasn't involved in the study, "suggests the possibility of interventions which could prove to be powerful ways to prevent or delay age-related macular degeneration."

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more about age-related macular degeneration.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Brigham Young University, news release, Aug. 19, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 29, 2008

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