ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Add your Article

Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack

By Ed Edelson
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Any exercise program can improve blood flow after a heart attack, but the benefit vanishes just four weeks after exercise is stopped, a new Swiss study finds.

"The main goal of our study was to determine the impact of different types of exercise on vascular [blood vessel] function," said Dr. Margherita Vona, director of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Center at the Clinique Valmont-Genolier in Glion sur Montreux. "The conclusion was that in our patients, after a heart attack, all types of exercise were useful for correcting vascular dysfunction, without any difference among aerobic, resistance or combined training."

But the improvement in blood flow seen in the 209 heart attack survivors enrolled in the program was lost four weeks after they stopped exercising, according to the report in the March 31 issue of Circulation.

"These data imply that good, long-term adherence to training programs is necessary to maintain vascular benefits on endothelial dysfunction," Vona said.

The endothelium is the inner lining of blood vessels. Its failure to perform efficiently increases the risk of a blood clot that can block an artery, causing a heart attack.

Participants in the trial were randomly assigned to aerobic training, resistance training, a combination of aerobic and resistance training, or no training at all.

Those who did aerobic training had four weekly sessions, including a 10-minute warm-up, 40 minutes of cycling that increased the heart rate to 75 percent of maximum and a 10-minute cool-down. Resistance training had four weekly sessions of 10 exercises with weights and rubber bands, lasting 45 seconds to one minute, with recovery intervals of 15 to 30 seconds.

Endothelial function was measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), the amount that blood vessels widen to increase blood flow. FMD more than doubled, from 4 percent to 10 percent, in both exercise groups. There was no significant change in FMD in the non-exercising participants.

However, the increase in FMD was lost a month after the regular exercise program ended.

"This aspect is particularly important in patients with coronary artery disease, in whom correction of endothelial dysfunction could help to slow the progression of atherosclerosis and probably avoid new cardiovascular events," Vona said.

None of the exercises caused problems for the participants, she added.

The resistance training program followed American Heart Association guidelines, Vona said. "Following the guidelines of the American Heart Association, all people can do resistance training," she said. "Many papers show beneficial effects of resistance training on cardiac and muscle function, in normal people and also, for example, in diabetic subjects."

The study does add some insight to the well-worn subject of exercise and the heart, said Dr. Johnny Lee, an assistant clinical professor of medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

One is about the type of exercise that should be done, Lee said. "Most of the time, we tell patients about aerobic exercises -- running, jogging and swimming," he said. "We haven't thought that resistance exercise, lifting weights and the like, can have an equal benefit. This shows that it does. That there was benefit from aerobic exercise was no surprise. What was a surprise was that resistance exercise gave equal benefit."

Second, the loss of benefit after exercising stopped that was seen in the study participants, who by definition are in the highest cardiac risk group because they have had heart attacks, carries a message for lower-risk people, Lee said.

"If this applies to the sickest patients, that if you stop you are going to lose the benefit, it shows that continuing to exercise can only have a positive effect if you are a normal subject with no heart disease," Lee said.

More information

A guide to exercise after a heart attack is offered by the American Heart Association.



SOURCES: Margherita Vona, M.D., director, Cardiac Rehabilitation Center, Clinique Valmont-Genolier, Glion sur Montreux, Switzerland; Johnny Lee, M.D., assistant clinical professor, medicine, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York City; March 31, 2009, Circulation

Last Updated: March 16, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com