ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
CANCER
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise

Cold weather shouldn't keep you from exercising outdoors.

"If you are concerned about hypothermia, you don't need to be unless the temperatures are extreme," Gary Sforzo, a professor of exercise and sports sciences at Ithaca College, said in a news release from the school.

"The body produces a lot of heat during exercise and when it produces heat, it pretty much diminishes any chance of hypothermia," he explained. "The key is continuous exercise. If you go outdoors for a walk or run, just move continuously. Don't stop for five or 10 minutes to talk to your neighbor. Hikers sometimes get into trouble if they stop for lunch. As long as you are moving, the muscles produce metabolic heat and that metabolic heat will keep you pretty warm, sometimes to the point where you need to remove clothing."

Proper clothing is important. The layer next to your skin should be a synthetic material that transports perspiration away from the skin. Don't wear cotton, which retains moisture. Your outer layer should be a windproof jacket.

"The danger zone is typically in the -20 to -30 windchill zone," Sforzo said. "When the ambient temperature is in the single digits or below and you have wind, you can have some problems. When the ambient temperature gets to 20 below with even the slightest wind, then obviously hypothermia is a problem if you stand around. But in those conditions you are also looking at the potential of frostbite."

To prevent frostbite, keep extremities covered with a hat, gloves and good footwear. To protect your nose, wear a scarf as high as possible on your face, Sforzo recommended.

He noted that the body adapts to cold temperatures, "so don't wait until it is 5 degrees outside to have your first [exercise] session. When the body adapts, it will have a couple of different changes. It will shiver differently and it will more readily release hormones like epinephrine and thyroxine, which allow the body to produce heat more effectively in cold weather. Get used to the cold, and it will become more comfortable."

SOURCES: Ithaca College, news release, Feb. 9, 2010 Published on: February 20, 2010