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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
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ANIMAL CARE
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BONES & JOINTS
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CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
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Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
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Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
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New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
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More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
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ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
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HEAD & NECK
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HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
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HEARING
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Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
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INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
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INFERTILITY
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KID'S HEALTH
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MEN'S HEALTH
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MENTAL HEALTH
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PAIN
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PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
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Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise

Cold weather shouldn't keep you from exercising outdoors.

"If you are concerned about hypothermia, you don't need to be unless the temperatures are extreme," Gary Sforzo, a professor of exercise and sports sciences at Ithaca College, said in a news release from the school.

"The body produces a lot of heat during exercise and when it produces heat, it pretty much diminishes any chance of hypothermia," he explained. "The key is continuous exercise. If you go outdoors for a walk or run, just move continuously. Don't stop for five or 10 minutes to talk to your neighbor. Hikers sometimes get into trouble if they stop for lunch. As long as you are moving, the muscles produce metabolic heat and that metabolic heat will keep you pretty warm, sometimes to the point where you need to remove clothing."

Proper clothing is important. The layer next to your skin should be a synthetic material that transports perspiration away from the skin. Don't wear cotton, which retains moisture. Your outer layer should be a windproof jacket.

"The danger zone is typically in the -20 to -30 windchill zone," Sforzo said. "When the ambient temperature is in the single digits or below and you have wind, you can have some problems. When the ambient temperature gets to 20 below with even the slightest wind, then obviously hypothermia is a problem if you stand around. But in those conditions you are also looking at the potential of frostbite."

To prevent frostbite, keep extremities covered with a hat, gloves and good footwear. To protect your nose, wear a scarf as high as possible on your face, Sforzo recommended.

He noted that the body adapts to cold temperatures, "so don't wait until it is 5 degrees outside to have your first [exercise] session. When the body adapts, it will have a couple of different changes. It will shiver differently and it will more readily release hormones like epinephrine and thyroxine, which allow the body to produce heat more effectively in cold weather. Get used to the cold, and it will become more comfortable."

SOURCES: Ithaca College, news release, Feb. 9, 2010 Published on: February 20, 2010