ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
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Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage

(HealthDay News) -- People who have asthma and who also smoke could reverse some of the damage to their lungs by saying no to cigarettes, new Dutch research suggests.

"We found that exposure to cigarette smoke appears to increase the thickness of the epithelium, or lining, of the airways in the lung," Martine Broekema, lead author of the study and a researcher at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, said in a news release from the American Thoracic Society. "This may be the underlying cause of the fact that smoking asthma patients experience more asthma symptoms, such as shortness of breath and phlegm production, compared to nonsmoking asthma patients."

The researchers looked at 147 people with asthma symptoms, including 35 smokers, 46 ex-smokers and 66 people who had never smoked.

People who currently smoked had more cells that produce mucous than did those who never smoked, the researchers found. "These pathological findings were associated with the severity of phlegm production reported by the asthma patients, suggesting a causal relationship between the two," Broekema said. "Smoking asthmatics also showed a distinct inflammatory profile in their lungs compared to never-smoking asthmatics."

"Furthermore, our data suggest that smoking cessation can reverse the thickening of the lining of the airways," she said.

The findings are published in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

In the big picture, "this study shows again how important smoking cessation is for pulmonary health, and this appears to be especially true for asthmatic patients," Broekema said. "The good news is that quitting appears to have a measurable benefit in these individuals."

SOURCES: American Thoracic Society, news release, Dec. 7, 2009 Published on: December 07, 2009