ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Functional Foods Uncovered
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
EYE CARE, VISION
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
FITNESS
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Go To Work But Skip The Car
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
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Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage

(HealthDay News) -- People who have asthma and who also smoke could reverse some of the damage to their lungs by saying no to cigarettes, new Dutch research suggests.

"We found that exposure to cigarette smoke appears to increase the thickness of the epithelium, or lining, of the airways in the lung," Martine Broekema, lead author of the study and a researcher at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, said in a news release from the American Thoracic Society. "This may be the underlying cause of the fact that smoking asthma patients experience more asthma symptoms, such as shortness of breath and phlegm production, compared to nonsmoking asthma patients."

The researchers looked at 147 people with asthma symptoms, including 35 smokers, 46 ex-smokers and 66 people who had never smoked.

People who currently smoked had more cells that produce mucous than did those who never smoked, the researchers found. "These pathological findings were associated with the severity of phlegm production reported by the asthma patients, suggesting a causal relationship between the two," Broekema said. "Smoking asthmatics also showed a distinct inflammatory profile in their lungs compared to never-smoking asthmatics."

"Furthermore, our data suggest that smoking cessation can reverse the thickening of the lining of the airways," she said.

The findings are published in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

In the big picture, "this study shows again how important smoking cessation is for pulmonary health, and this appears to be especially true for asthmatic patients," Broekema said. "The good news is that quitting appears to have a measurable benefit in these individuals."

SOURCES: American Thoracic Society, news release, Dec. 7, 2009 Published on: December 07, 2009