ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
CANCER
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Be Healthy, Spend Less
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
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Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage

(HealthDay News) -- People who have asthma and who also smoke could reverse some of the damage to their lungs by saying no to cigarettes, new Dutch research suggests.

"We found that exposure to cigarette smoke appears to increase the thickness of the epithelium, or lining, of the airways in the lung," Martine Broekema, lead author of the study and a researcher at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, said in a news release from the American Thoracic Society. "This may be the underlying cause of the fact that smoking asthma patients experience more asthma symptoms, such as shortness of breath and phlegm production, compared to nonsmoking asthma patients."

The researchers looked at 147 people with asthma symptoms, including 35 smokers, 46 ex-smokers and 66 people who had never smoked.

People who currently smoked had more cells that produce mucous than did those who never smoked, the researchers found. "These pathological findings were associated with the severity of phlegm production reported by the asthma patients, suggesting a causal relationship between the two," Broekema said. "Smoking asthmatics also showed a distinct inflammatory profile in their lungs compared to never-smoking asthmatics."

"Furthermore, our data suggest that smoking cessation can reverse the thickening of the lining of the airways," she said.

The findings are published in the Dec. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

In the big picture, "this study shows again how important smoking cessation is for pulmonary health, and this appears to be especially true for asthmatic patients," Broekema said. "The good news is that quitting appears to have a measurable benefit in these individuals."

SOURCES: American Thoracic Society, news release, Dec. 7, 2009 Published on: December 07, 2009