ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
CAREGIVING
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
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Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking

MONDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- About 25 percent of practicing clinicians in the United States aren't aware of two major federal government-funded clinical trials of complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies, a new survey has found.

The survey, which included 1,561 acupuncturists, naturopaths, internists and rheumatologists, also found that many clinicians aren't fully confident in their ability to interpret research results.

CAM therapies are widely used in the United States, but it's only been in recent years that rigorous studies of the safety and effectiveness of the treatments have been conducted, according to background information in the study. For example, the U.S. National Institutes of Health has spent more than $2 billion on research into CAM therapies in the past decade.

The survey found that 59 percent of the respondents were aware of at least one of two major clinical trails recently published on CAM therapies for osteoarthritis of the knee (one on acupuncture and one on the supplement glucosamine), and 23 percent were aware of both trials.

Rheumatologists (49 percent) and acupuncturists (46 percent) were more likely to be aware of the acupuncture study than naturopaths (30 percent) and general internists (22 percent). Rheumatologists (88 percent) and internists (59 percent) were more likely to know about the glucosamine trial than naturopaths (39 percent) and acupuncturists (20 percent).

The survey also found that a minority of respondents said they were "very confident" in their ability to critically interpret research literature: 33 percent of rheumatologists, 25 percent of naturopaths, 20 percent of acupuncturists and 17 percent of internists. Most said they were "moderately confident": 67 percent of internists, 64 percent of naturopaths, 59 percent of acupuncturists and 59 percent of rheumatologists.

Respondents who were aware of CAM trials "were more likely to be rheumatologists, to be practicing in an institutional or academic setting, to have some research experience, to express greater ability to interpret evidence and to report greater acceptance of evidence," the researchers wrote.

The findings, which are in the April 13 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, suggest that the training, attitudes and experiences of clinicians may have a major effect on whether CAM trial results are translated into clinical practice.

"For evidence from clinical research to have an impact on medical practice, health-care professionals must first be aware of the research," wrote Dr. Jon C. Tilburt, of the NIH and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and his colleagues. "Once aware, health-care professionals must be able to interpret these findings, judging both their validity and their implications. Finally, they must apply the scientific evidence to their own practices."

They concluded that "concerted efforts must be undertaken that more deliberately train clinicians in critical appraisal, biostatistics and use of evidence-based resources, as well as expanded research opportunities, dedicated training experiences and improved dissemination of research results."

More information

The U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine has more about CAM therapies.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, April 13, 2009

Last Updated: April 13, 2009

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