ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Countdown to Hair Loss
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
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Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking

MONDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- About 25 percent of practicing clinicians in the United States aren't aware of two major federal government-funded clinical trials of complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies, a new survey has found.

The survey, which included 1,561 acupuncturists, naturopaths, internists and rheumatologists, also found that many clinicians aren't fully confident in their ability to interpret research results.

CAM therapies are widely used in the United States, but it's only been in recent years that rigorous studies of the safety and effectiveness of the treatments have been conducted, according to background information in the study. For example, the U.S. National Institutes of Health has spent more than $2 billion on research into CAM therapies in the past decade.

The survey found that 59 percent of the respondents were aware of at least one of two major clinical trails recently published on CAM therapies for osteoarthritis of the knee (one on acupuncture and one on the supplement glucosamine), and 23 percent were aware of both trials.

Rheumatologists (49 percent) and acupuncturists (46 percent) were more likely to be aware of the acupuncture study than naturopaths (30 percent) and general internists (22 percent). Rheumatologists (88 percent) and internists (59 percent) were more likely to know about the glucosamine trial than naturopaths (39 percent) and acupuncturists (20 percent).

The survey also found that a minority of respondents said they were "very confident" in their ability to critically interpret research literature: 33 percent of rheumatologists, 25 percent of naturopaths, 20 percent of acupuncturists and 17 percent of internists. Most said they were "moderately confident": 67 percent of internists, 64 percent of naturopaths, 59 percent of acupuncturists and 59 percent of rheumatologists.

Respondents who were aware of CAM trials "were more likely to be rheumatologists, to be practicing in an institutional or academic setting, to have some research experience, to express greater ability to interpret evidence and to report greater acceptance of evidence," the researchers wrote.

The findings, which are in the April 13 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, suggest that the training, attitudes and experiences of clinicians may have a major effect on whether CAM trial results are translated into clinical practice.

"For evidence from clinical research to have an impact on medical practice, health-care professionals must first be aware of the research," wrote Dr. Jon C. Tilburt, of the NIH and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and his colleagues. "Once aware, health-care professionals must be able to interpret these findings, judging both their validity and their implications. Finally, they must apply the scientific evidence to their own practices."

They concluded that "concerted efforts must be undertaken that more deliberately train clinicians in critical appraisal, biostatistics and use of evidence-based resources, as well as expanded research opportunities, dedicated training experiences and improved dissemination of research results."

More information

The U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine has more about CAM therapies.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, April 13, 2009

Last Updated: April 13, 2009

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