ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
CANCER
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Go To Work But Skip The Car
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
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Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking

MONDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- About 25 percent of practicing clinicians in the United States aren't aware of two major federal government-funded clinical trials of complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies, a new survey has found.

The survey, which included 1,561 acupuncturists, naturopaths, internists and rheumatologists, also found that many clinicians aren't fully confident in their ability to interpret research results.

CAM therapies are widely used in the United States, but it's only been in recent years that rigorous studies of the safety and effectiveness of the treatments have been conducted, according to background information in the study. For example, the U.S. National Institutes of Health has spent more than $2 billion on research into CAM therapies in the past decade.

The survey found that 59 percent of the respondents were aware of at least one of two major clinical trails recently published on CAM therapies for osteoarthritis of the knee (one on acupuncture and one on the supplement glucosamine), and 23 percent were aware of both trials.

Rheumatologists (49 percent) and acupuncturists (46 percent) were more likely to be aware of the acupuncture study than naturopaths (30 percent) and general internists (22 percent). Rheumatologists (88 percent) and internists (59 percent) were more likely to know about the glucosamine trial than naturopaths (39 percent) and acupuncturists (20 percent).

The survey also found that a minority of respondents said they were "very confident" in their ability to critically interpret research literature: 33 percent of rheumatologists, 25 percent of naturopaths, 20 percent of acupuncturists and 17 percent of internists. Most said they were "moderately confident": 67 percent of internists, 64 percent of naturopaths, 59 percent of acupuncturists and 59 percent of rheumatologists.

Respondents who were aware of CAM trials "were more likely to be rheumatologists, to be practicing in an institutional or academic setting, to have some research experience, to express greater ability to interpret evidence and to report greater acceptance of evidence," the researchers wrote.

The findings, which are in the April 13 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, suggest that the training, attitudes and experiences of clinicians may have a major effect on whether CAM trial results are translated into clinical practice.

"For evidence from clinical research to have an impact on medical practice, health-care professionals must first be aware of the research," wrote Dr. Jon C. Tilburt, of the NIH and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and his colleagues. "Once aware, health-care professionals must be able to interpret these findings, judging both their validity and their implications. Finally, they must apply the scientific evidence to their own practices."

They concluded that "concerted efforts must be undertaken that more deliberately train clinicians in critical appraisal, biostatistics and use of evidence-based resources, as well as expanded research opportunities, dedicated training experiences and improved dissemination of research results."

More information

The U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine has more about CAM therapies.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, April 13, 2009

Last Updated: April 13, 2009

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