ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
Oregano Shown to be the Most Powerful Culinary Herb
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Smog Tougher on the Obese
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
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Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Infants exposed to high levels of pollen and mold in their first few months of life are more likely to develop wheezing -- a possible early symptom of asthma, say U.S. researchers.

They studied 514 children born in 1999 and 2000 in California's Salinas Valley, and found that children born in high mold season (fall and winter) were three times more likely to develop wheezing by age 2 than children born at other times of the year. The researchers also found that total pollen concentration exposure during the first three months of life increased the risk of early wheezing.

As many as 40 percent of children who wheeze early in life may go on to develop childhood asthma, especially if they have other allergic symptoms, according to the authors of the study, published online Feb. 24 in the journal Thorax.

The findings may help clarify why babies born in the fall and winter appear to have a higher risk of developing asthma than children born in the summer.

One previous study found that babies born in the fall are at greater risk of developing childhood asthma. The authors of that study suggested that early-life exposure to respiratory viruses during the peak cold and flu season may be to blame.

"In our study, we took a different tack to understand the link between month of birth and asthma by considering ambient concentrations of fungal spores and pollen, which follow distinct seasonal patterns," study author Kim Harley, associate director of health effects research at UC Berkeley's Center for Children's Environmental Health Research, said in a university news release.

"Until our paper, there were very little data about exposure to allergens in the air, which we know can trigger symptoms for those who already have asthma. This is the first study to look at the potential role of early life exposure to multiple outdoor fungal and pollen groups in the development of asthma," Harley said.

She and her colleagues were continuing to follow the children in the study.

"We are not in a position to say conclusively why some children develop asthma, or to even suggest precautionary measures to help babies born in the fall and winter," study senior author Dr. Ira Tager, professor of epidemiology, said in the news release. "We already know that family history is a major risk factor for developing asthma, but the role environmental factors play is still being fleshed out. What this study does is provide valuable clues about airborne allergens that are worth exploring further."

More information

The American Lung Association has more about childhood asthma.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: University of California, Berkeley, news releaes, Feb. 23, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 26, 2009

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