ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Eating Free Range
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
Hoping for a Happy Family Holiday? Here's How
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
The Unmedicated Mind
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Add your Article

Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists

(HealthDay News) -- The start of a new school year means it's time to remind students and parents about proper selection and use of backpacks.

"When used correctly, backpacks are the most efficient way to carry a load and distribute the weight among some of the body's strongest muscles," Eric Wall, director of the orthopedic surgery division at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a center news release.

However, improper use of backpacks can cause injuries that require medical treatment. For example, backpack-related injuries send almost 6,000 students to emergency departments each year, according to a U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission report released in 2002.

Wall and his colleagues in the division of orthopedic surgery offer guidelines to prevent school backpack-related injuries:

* When shopping for a backpack, select one that's lightweight, has two wide and padded shoulder straps, a cushioned back, and waist straps. A pack with wheels may be a good option if your child has to lug a very heavy load.
* Children should always use both shoulder straps, and the straps should be cinched tight.
* Limit backpack loads to no more than 15 percent to 20 percent of a child's body weight.
* The heaviest items should be packed closest to the center of a child's back.
* Children shouldn't carry all of their books throughout the school day. They should keep their books in their locker and get them when they need them.
* When wearing or lifting a heavy backpack, children should bend using both knees.
* Don't leave backpacks on the floor where people can trip on them, and don't swing a pack around where it can hit other people.
* If your child uses a backpack and complains of persistent back pain, consult with a pediatrician.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about backpack safety.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, news release, Aug. 6, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 17, 2008

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