ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
Run for Your Life
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Football Can Shrink Players
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Maximize Your Run
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Drink Away Dementia?
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Add your Article

Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists

(HealthDay News) -- The start of a new school year means it's time to remind students and parents about proper selection and use of backpacks.

"When used correctly, backpacks are the most efficient way to carry a load and distribute the weight among some of the body's strongest muscles," Eric Wall, director of the orthopedic surgery division at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a center news release.

However, improper use of backpacks can cause injuries that require medical treatment. For example, backpack-related injuries send almost 6,000 students to emergency departments each year, according to a U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission report released in 2002.

Wall and his colleagues in the division of orthopedic surgery offer guidelines to prevent school backpack-related injuries:

* When shopping for a backpack, select one that's lightweight, has two wide and padded shoulder straps, a cushioned back, and waist straps. A pack with wheels may be a good option if your child has to lug a very heavy load.
* Children should always use both shoulder straps, and the straps should be cinched tight.
* Limit backpack loads to no more than 15 percent to 20 percent of a child's body weight.
* The heaviest items should be packed closest to the center of a child's back.
* Children shouldn't carry all of their books throughout the school day. They should keep their books in their locker and get them when they need them.
* When wearing or lifting a heavy backpack, children should bend using both knees.
* Don't leave backpacks on the floor where people can trip on them, and don't swing a pack around where it can hit other people.
* If your child uses a backpack and complains of persistent back pain, consult with a pediatrician.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about backpack safety.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, news release, Aug. 6, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 17, 2008

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