ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
CANCER
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
EYE CARE, VISION
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FITNESS
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Add your Article

Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists

(HealthDay News) -- The start of a new school year means it's time to remind students and parents about proper selection and use of backpacks.

"When used correctly, backpacks are the most efficient way to carry a load and distribute the weight among some of the body's strongest muscles," Eric Wall, director of the orthopedic surgery division at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a center news release.

However, improper use of backpacks can cause injuries that require medical treatment. For example, backpack-related injuries send almost 6,000 students to emergency departments each year, according to a U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission report released in 2002.

Wall and his colleagues in the division of orthopedic surgery offer guidelines to prevent school backpack-related injuries:

* When shopping for a backpack, select one that's lightweight, has two wide and padded shoulder straps, a cushioned back, and waist straps. A pack with wheels may be a good option if your child has to lug a very heavy load.
* Children should always use both shoulder straps, and the straps should be cinched tight.
* Limit backpack loads to no more than 15 percent to 20 percent of a child's body weight.
* The heaviest items should be packed closest to the center of a child's back.
* Children shouldn't carry all of their books throughout the school day. They should keep their books in their locker and get them when they need them.
* When wearing or lifting a heavy backpack, children should bend using both knees.
* Don't leave backpacks on the floor where people can trip on them, and don't swing a pack around where it can hit other people.
* If your child uses a backpack and complains of persistent back pain, consult with a pediatrician.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about backpack safety.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, news release, Aug. 6, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 17, 2008

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