ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Maximize Your Run
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists

(HealthDay News) -- The start of a new school year means it's time to remind students and parents about proper selection and use of backpacks.

"When used correctly, backpacks are the most efficient way to carry a load and distribute the weight among some of the body's strongest muscles," Eric Wall, director of the orthopedic surgery division at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a center news release.

However, improper use of backpacks can cause injuries that require medical treatment. For example, backpack-related injuries send almost 6,000 students to emergency departments each year, according to a U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission report released in 2002.

Wall and his colleagues in the division of orthopedic surgery offer guidelines to prevent school backpack-related injuries:

* When shopping for a backpack, select one that's lightweight, has two wide and padded shoulder straps, a cushioned back, and waist straps. A pack with wheels may be a good option if your child has to lug a very heavy load.
* Children should always use both shoulder straps, and the straps should be cinched tight.
* Limit backpack loads to no more than 15 percent to 20 percent of a child's body weight.
* The heaviest items should be packed closest to the center of a child's back.
* Children shouldn't carry all of their books throughout the school day. They should keep their books in their locker and get them when they need them.
* When wearing or lifting a heavy backpack, children should bend using both knees.
* Don't leave backpacks on the floor where people can trip on them, and don't swing a pack around where it can hit other people.
* If your child uses a backpack and complains of persistent back pain, consult with a pediatrician.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about backpack safety.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, news release, Aug. 6, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 17, 2008

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