ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
CAREGIVING
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Help Your Kids Stay Active
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
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Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey

(HealthDay News) -- Manuka honey, known for its anti-microbial properties, might kill MRSA bacteria.

A new study from the University of Wales Institute-Cardiff suggests that the honey, made solely from flowers found on the New Zealand manuka bush, inhibits several proteins, especially the FabI protein, which is needed for fatty acid biosynthesis. The study was to be presented this week at a meeting in Scotland of the Society for General Microbiology.

MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is a potentially deadly bacterial infection that defies many treatments. Most MRSA infections occur in hospitals or other health-care settings.

Proponents of alternative therapies tout the benefits of manuka honey as a wound dressing, claiming it has substantial anti-microbial benefits. The manuka bush is also known as the tea tree bush, and its oil is used in many toiletries.

The researchers treated MRSA samples with manuka for four hours. They then repeated the experiment with sugar syrup to determine if the anti-microbial effects were caused by sugars in the honey.

After breaking down the bacterial cells, the researchers noted far fewer proteins in the manuka culture, especially FabI. Their absence could help explain manuka honey's method of killing MRSA, they said.

"Manuka and other honeys have been known to have wound healing and anti-bacterial properties for some time," researcher Rowena Jenkins said in a news release from the society.

SOURCES: Society for General Microbiology, news release, Sept. 6, 2009