ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
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Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey

(HealthDay News) -- Manuka honey, known for its anti-microbial properties, might kill MRSA bacteria.

A new study from the University of Wales Institute-Cardiff suggests that the honey, made solely from flowers found on the New Zealand manuka bush, inhibits several proteins, especially the FabI protein, which is needed for fatty acid biosynthesis. The study was to be presented this week at a meeting in Scotland of the Society for General Microbiology.

MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is a potentially deadly bacterial infection that defies many treatments. Most MRSA infections occur in hospitals or other health-care settings.

Proponents of alternative therapies tout the benefits of manuka honey as a wound dressing, claiming it has substantial anti-microbial benefits. The manuka bush is also known as the tea tree bush, and its oil is used in many toiletries.

The researchers treated MRSA samples with manuka for four hours. They then repeated the experiment with sugar syrup to determine if the anti-microbial effects were caused by sugars in the honey.

After breaking down the bacterial cells, the researchers noted far fewer proteins in the manuka culture, especially FabI. Their absence could help explain manuka honey's method of killing MRSA, they said.

"Manuka and other honeys have been known to have wound healing and anti-bacterial properties for some time," researcher Rowena Jenkins said in a news release from the society.

SOURCES: Society for General Microbiology, news release, Sept. 6, 2009