ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
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Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey

(HealthDay News) -- Manuka honey, known for its anti-microbial properties, might kill MRSA bacteria.

A new study from the University of Wales Institute-Cardiff suggests that the honey, made solely from flowers found on the New Zealand manuka bush, inhibits several proteins, especially the FabI protein, which is needed for fatty acid biosynthesis. The study was to be presented this week at a meeting in Scotland of the Society for General Microbiology.

MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is a potentially deadly bacterial infection that defies many treatments. Most MRSA infections occur in hospitals or other health-care settings.

Proponents of alternative therapies tout the benefits of manuka honey as a wound dressing, claiming it has substantial anti-microbial benefits. The manuka bush is also known as the tea tree bush, and its oil is used in many toiletries.

The researchers treated MRSA samples with manuka for four hours. They then repeated the experiment with sugar syrup to determine if the anti-microbial effects were caused by sugars in the honey.

After breaking down the bacterial cells, the researchers noted far fewer proteins in the manuka culture, especially FabI. Their absence could help explain manuka honey's method of killing MRSA, they said.

"Manuka and other honeys have been known to have wound healing and anti-bacterial properties for some time," researcher Rowena Jenkins said in a news release from the society.

SOURCES: Society for General Microbiology, news release, Sept. 6, 2009