ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
CAREGIVING
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
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Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up

(HealthDay News) -- Better quality sleep and more efficient sleep just might lead to higher grades, especially in math.

That's the finding of a study that included 56 teens, ages 14 to 18, who had complained of insufficient sleep at night or daytime sleepiness. Researchers measured the sleep of the participants, and the teens provided information on their grades.

The study found an association between higher math scores and fewer awakenings at night, less time spent in bed, higher sleep efficiency, greater sleep quality and less time taken to fall into a deep sleep at night. Higher scores in English were associated with fewer nighttime awakenings. And there also was a link found between increased time taken to fall into a deep sleep during the weekends and worse overall academic performance.

The researchers said they were surprised to find that although more and better sleep produced overall academic improvements, different aspects of sleep were associated with different types of functioning.

"Sleep deficits cause problems for adolescents, but students differ in their personal resources and in how chaotic their sleep-wake schedules are," principal investigator Jennifer C. Cousins, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, said in a news release from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

"The more regular and predictable their sleep is, the better they are likely to do when confronted with short-term sleep deficits," she said. "Therefore, participants with better sleep overall may be affected differently in a sleep condition compared to those who have a more varying sleep/wake schedule."

The study was to be presented June 10 in Seattle at the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

SOURCES: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, news release, June 10, 2009 Published on: June 10, 2009