ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Winter Is Tough on Feet
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
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Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up

(HealthDay News) -- Better quality sleep and more efficient sleep just might lead to higher grades, especially in math.

That's the finding of a study that included 56 teens, ages 14 to 18, who had complained of insufficient sleep at night or daytime sleepiness. Researchers measured the sleep of the participants, and the teens provided information on their grades.

The study found an association between higher math scores and fewer awakenings at night, less time spent in bed, higher sleep efficiency, greater sleep quality and less time taken to fall into a deep sleep at night. Higher scores in English were associated with fewer nighttime awakenings. And there also was a link found between increased time taken to fall into a deep sleep during the weekends and worse overall academic performance.

The researchers said they were surprised to find that although more and better sleep produced overall academic improvements, different aspects of sleep were associated with different types of functioning.

"Sleep deficits cause problems for adolescents, but students differ in their personal resources and in how chaotic their sleep-wake schedules are," principal investigator Jennifer C. Cousins, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, said in a news release from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

"The more regular and predictable their sleep is, the better they are likely to do when confronted with short-term sleep deficits," she said. "Therefore, participants with better sleep overall may be affected differently in a sleep condition compared to those who have a more varying sleep/wake schedule."

The study was to be presented June 10 in Seattle at the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

SOURCES: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, news release, June 10, 2009 Published on: June 10, 2009