ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
CANCER
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
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Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up

(HealthDay News) -- Better quality sleep and more efficient sleep just might lead to higher grades, especially in math.

That's the finding of a study that included 56 teens, ages 14 to 18, who had complained of insufficient sleep at night or daytime sleepiness. Researchers measured the sleep of the participants, and the teens provided information on their grades.

The study found an association between higher math scores and fewer awakenings at night, less time spent in bed, higher sleep efficiency, greater sleep quality and less time taken to fall into a deep sleep at night. Higher scores in English were associated with fewer nighttime awakenings. And there also was a link found between increased time taken to fall into a deep sleep during the weekends and worse overall academic performance.

The researchers said they were surprised to find that although more and better sleep produced overall academic improvements, different aspects of sleep were associated with different types of functioning.

"Sleep deficits cause problems for adolescents, but students differ in their personal resources and in how chaotic their sleep-wake schedules are," principal investigator Jennifer C. Cousins, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, said in a news release from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

"The more regular and predictable their sleep is, the better they are likely to do when confronted with short-term sleep deficits," she said. "Therefore, participants with better sleep overall may be affected differently in a sleep condition compared to those who have a more varying sleep/wake schedule."

The study was to be presented June 10 in Seattle at the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

SOURCES: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, news release, June 10, 2009 Published on: June 10, 2009