ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
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Beware of Dog Bites

SUNDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) --They can be cute and cuddly, but even friendly dogs can be unpredictable, warns the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

Some 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One in five bites requires medical attention. In 2006, more than 31,000 people had to have reconstructive surgery as a result of being bitten.

Children are particularly at risk. Among children, the rate of dog bite injuries is highest for those aged 5 to 9. Children are more likely than adults to receive medical attention for dog bites than adults.

"Most dogs are friendly, with no intentions to cause harm to anyone, said ACEP President Dr. Nick Jouriles. "But sometimes, they act aggressively toward strangers for a variety of reasons."

How can dog bites be prevented?

* Avoid unfamiliar dogs or any dogs acting strangely. Just stay away from them if you can.
* Don't run from, scream at or startle a dog.
* Remain motionless if approached by an unfamiliar, possibly threatening dog.
* If knocked over by a dog, roll into a ball, lie still and cover your head if possible.
* Avoid direct eye contact with a dog.
* Don't bother a dog if it's sleeping, eating or caring for puppies.
* Don't pet an unknown dog without allowing it to see and sniff you first.
* Talk to your kids about this information, and make sure they understand the dangers before they go out and play.

What do you do if you are bitten?

* Tell children to immediately inform an adult and seek medical attention.
* If bleeding, put pressure on the wound and clean the area with running water.
* If you develop a fever or other signs of infection, such as swelling, redness, pain, a bad smell or fluid draining from the area, see a doctor immediately.
* Call 911 if it is a severe attack, there is extensive bleeding or the bite is near the face.
* Most dogs that have owners are vaccinated against rabies. If you are not sure, contact your doctor, your local health department or animal control. Children or adults may need a tetanus shot.

How can you prevent aggressive behavior?

* Have your dog spayed or neutered to reduce aggressive tendencies.
* Never leave infants or young children alone with a dog.
* Make sure your child has had a tetanus shot.
* Don't play aggressive games with your dogs.
* Properly socialize and train them.
* Immediately seek professional advice if your dog shows aggressive behaviors.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on dog bite prevention.



--Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American College of Emergency Physicians, news release, April 2009

Last Updated: May 17, 2009

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