ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
CAREGIVING
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
EYE CARE, VISION
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Barefoot Best for Running?
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Add your Article

Beware of Dog Bites

SUNDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) --They can be cute and cuddly, but even friendly dogs can be unpredictable, warns the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

Some 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One in five bites requires medical attention. In 2006, more than 31,000 people had to have reconstructive surgery as a result of being bitten.

Children are particularly at risk. Among children, the rate of dog bite injuries is highest for those aged 5 to 9. Children are more likely than adults to receive medical attention for dog bites than adults.

"Most dogs are friendly, with no intentions to cause harm to anyone, said ACEP President Dr. Nick Jouriles. "But sometimes, they act aggressively toward strangers for a variety of reasons."

How can dog bites be prevented?

* Avoid unfamiliar dogs or any dogs acting strangely. Just stay away from them if you can.
* Don't run from, scream at or startle a dog.
* Remain motionless if approached by an unfamiliar, possibly threatening dog.
* If knocked over by a dog, roll into a ball, lie still and cover your head if possible.
* Avoid direct eye contact with a dog.
* Don't bother a dog if it's sleeping, eating or caring for puppies.
* Don't pet an unknown dog without allowing it to see and sniff you first.
* Talk to your kids about this information, and make sure they understand the dangers before they go out and play.

What do you do if you are bitten?

* Tell children to immediately inform an adult and seek medical attention.
* If bleeding, put pressure on the wound and clean the area with running water.
* If you develop a fever or other signs of infection, such as swelling, redness, pain, a bad smell or fluid draining from the area, see a doctor immediately.
* Call 911 if it is a severe attack, there is extensive bleeding or the bite is near the face.
* Most dogs that have owners are vaccinated against rabies. If you are not sure, contact your doctor, your local health department or animal control. Children or adults may need a tetanus shot.

How can you prevent aggressive behavior?

* Have your dog spayed or neutered to reduce aggressive tendencies.
* Never leave infants or young children alone with a dog.
* Make sure your child has had a tetanus shot.
* Don't play aggressive games with your dogs.
* Properly socialize and train them.
* Immediately seek professional advice if your dog shows aggressive behaviors.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on dog bite prevention.



--Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American College of Emergency Physicians, news release, April 2009

Last Updated: May 17, 2009

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