ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
CANCER
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
EYE CARE, VISION
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
After Job Loss, People Report More Health Issues
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Any Old Cane Won't Do
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Add your Article

Beware of Dog Bites

SUNDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) --They can be cute and cuddly, but even friendly dogs can be unpredictable, warns the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

Some 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One in five bites requires medical attention. In 2006, more than 31,000 people had to have reconstructive surgery as a result of being bitten.

Children are particularly at risk. Among children, the rate of dog bite injuries is highest for those aged 5 to 9. Children are more likely than adults to receive medical attention for dog bites than adults.

"Most dogs are friendly, with no intentions to cause harm to anyone, said ACEP President Dr. Nick Jouriles. "But sometimes, they act aggressively toward strangers for a variety of reasons."

How can dog bites be prevented?

* Avoid unfamiliar dogs or any dogs acting strangely. Just stay away from them if you can.
* Don't run from, scream at or startle a dog.
* Remain motionless if approached by an unfamiliar, possibly threatening dog.
* If knocked over by a dog, roll into a ball, lie still and cover your head if possible.
* Avoid direct eye contact with a dog.
* Don't bother a dog if it's sleeping, eating or caring for puppies.
* Don't pet an unknown dog without allowing it to see and sniff you first.
* Talk to your kids about this information, and make sure they understand the dangers before they go out and play.

What do you do if you are bitten?

* Tell children to immediately inform an adult and seek medical attention.
* If bleeding, put pressure on the wound and clean the area with running water.
* If you develop a fever or other signs of infection, such as swelling, redness, pain, a bad smell or fluid draining from the area, see a doctor immediately.
* Call 911 if it is a severe attack, there is extensive bleeding or the bite is near the face.
* Most dogs that have owners are vaccinated against rabies. If you are not sure, contact your doctor, your local health department or animal control. Children or adults may need a tetanus shot.

How can you prevent aggressive behavior?

* Have your dog spayed or neutered to reduce aggressive tendencies.
* Never leave infants or young children alone with a dog.
* Make sure your child has had a tetanus shot.
* Don't play aggressive games with your dogs.
* Properly socialize and train them.
* Immediately seek professional advice if your dog shows aggressive behaviors.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on dog bite prevention.



--Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American College of Emergency Physicians, news release, April 2009

Last Updated: May 17, 2009

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