ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
CAREGIVING
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
Eat Light - Live Longer
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Add your Article

Beware of Dog Bites

SUNDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) --They can be cute and cuddly, but even friendly dogs can be unpredictable, warns the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

Some 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One in five bites requires medical attention. In 2006, more than 31,000 people had to have reconstructive surgery as a result of being bitten.

Children are particularly at risk. Among children, the rate of dog bite injuries is highest for those aged 5 to 9. Children are more likely than adults to receive medical attention for dog bites than adults.

"Most dogs are friendly, with no intentions to cause harm to anyone, said ACEP President Dr. Nick Jouriles. "But sometimes, they act aggressively toward strangers for a variety of reasons."

How can dog bites be prevented?

* Avoid unfamiliar dogs or any dogs acting strangely. Just stay away from them if you can.
* Don't run from, scream at or startle a dog.
* Remain motionless if approached by an unfamiliar, possibly threatening dog.
* If knocked over by a dog, roll into a ball, lie still and cover your head if possible.
* Avoid direct eye contact with a dog.
* Don't bother a dog if it's sleeping, eating or caring for puppies.
* Don't pet an unknown dog without allowing it to see and sniff you first.
* Talk to your kids about this information, and make sure they understand the dangers before they go out and play.

What do you do if you are bitten?

* Tell children to immediately inform an adult and seek medical attention.
* If bleeding, put pressure on the wound and clean the area with running water.
* If you develop a fever or other signs of infection, such as swelling, redness, pain, a bad smell or fluid draining from the area, see a doctor immediately.
* Call 911 if it is a severe attack, there is extensive bleeding or the bite is near the face.
* Most dogs that have owners are vaccinated against rabies. If you are not sure, contact your doctor, your local health department or animal control. Children or adults may need a tetanus shot.

How can you prevent aggressive behavior?

* Have your dog spayed or neutered to reduce aggressive tendencies.
* Never leave infants or young children alone with a dog.
* Make sure your child has had a tetanus shot.
* Don't play aggressive games with your dogs.
* Properly socialize and train them.
* Immediately seek professional advice if your dog shows aggressive behaviors.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on dog bite prevention.



--Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American College of Emergency Physicians, news release, April 2009

Last Updated: May 17, 2009

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