ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EYE CARE, VISION
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
Maximize Your Run
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Checking levels of certain biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid may help predict the rate of cognitive decline in people with very mild dementia, and this information could be used to improve the effectiveness of clinical trials, say U.S. researchers.

Their study, published in the May issue of the journal Archives of Neurology, included 49 people who'd been diagnosed with very mild Alzheimer's disease. Samples of cerebrospinal fluid taken from the patients were tested for several biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's, including alpha-beta peptide 1-42 (Aβ42), tau, and phosphorylated tau 181 (ptau 181).

The patients had at least one follow-up assessment an average of 3.5 years later and the researchers found that the "rate of dementia progression was significantly more rapid in individuals with lower baseline cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 levels, higher tau or ptau 181 levels or high tau:Aβ42 ratios."

Finding effective treatments for Alzheimer's will likely depend on early identification of patients, noted study author Dr. Barbara J. Snider and colleagues at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

"Because there is a growing emphasis on enrolling individuals with less cognitive impairment into clinical trials of [possible] anti-Alzheimer's disease agents, methods are needed that will identify individuals with very mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type who are more likely to exhibit measurable cognitive decline during the study," the researchers wrote.

"Although the number of participants in this study was relatively small, the results suggest that cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers might be useful as entry criteria for clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies for mild cognitive impairment and very mild dementia of the Alzheimer type," they noted.

The study findings may "have important implications for reducing the number of participants needed to show an effect in clinical trials for very mild dementia of the Alzheimer type and mild cognitive impairment and, ultimately, to assist in making treatment decisions as more invasive and potentially harmful disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease become available," the authors concluded.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about dementia.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 12, 2009

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