ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
CAREGIVING
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
EYE CARE, VISION
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Add your Article

Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Checking levels of certain biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid may help predict the rate of cognitive decline in people with very mild dementia, and this information could be used to improve the effectiveness of clinical trials, say U.S. researchers.

Their study, published in the May issue of the journal Archives of Neurology, included 49 people who'd been diagnosed with very mild Alzheimer's disease. Samples of cerebrospinal fluid taken from the patients were tested for several biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's, including alpha-beta peptide 1-42 (Aβ42), tau, and phosphorylated tau 181 (ptau 181).

The patients had at least one follow-up assessment an average of 3.5 years later and the researchers found that the "rate of dementia progression was significantly more rapid in individuals with lower baseline cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 levels, higher tau or ptau 181 levels or high tau:Aβ42 ratios."

Finding effective treatments for Alzheimer's will likely depend on early identification of patients, noted study author Dr. Barbara J. Snider and colleagues at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

"Because there is a growing emphasis on enrolling individuals with less cognitive impairment into clinical trials of [possible] anti-Alzheimer's disease agents, methods are needed that will identify individuals with very mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type who are more likely to exhibit measurable cognitive decline during the study," the researchers wrote.

"Although the number of participants in this study was relatively small, the results suggest that cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers might be useful as entry criteria for clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies for mild cognitive impairment and very mild dementia of the Alzheimer type," they noted.

The study findings may "have important implications for reducing the number of participants needed to show an effect in clinical trials for very mild dementia of the Alzheimer type and mild cognitive impairment and, ultimately, to assist in making treatment decisions as more invasive and potentially harmful disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease become available," the authors concluded.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about dementia.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 12, 2009

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com