ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Fatty Acid in Olive Oil Wards Off Hunger
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Exercise Guards White Blood Cells Against Aging
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
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Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Calculating a woman's bone mineral density appears to shed light on her risk for breast cancer.

A new study has found that high bone mineral density (BMD) predicts a greater likelihood of developing breast cancer, independent of how high her risk is on the often-used Gail model.

The two measurements together might be used in tandem to better predict breast cancer risk, the researchers said.

The findings, which were expected to be published in the Sept. 1 issue of Cancer, follow closely on the heels of other research linking different aspects of bone health with breast cancer risk. One study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in May found that Zometa (zoledronic acid), a drug used to treat osteoporosis, lowered the risk of breast cancer recurrence in premenopausal women.

And another study released this spring found that women with breast cancer who have a vitamin D deficiency at the time of their diagnosis were more likely to have a recurrence or to die from their disease. Vitamin D is also critical to bone health.

The Gail model incorporates information on family history, age and other factors to estimate a woman's risk of breast cancer over five years and over her lifetime. The model does not, however, include data on bone mineral density, which is known to be a risk factor for breast cancer.

This study, led by researchers at the University of Arizona, Tucson, incorporated Gail scores and hip BMD information on almost 10,000 postmenopausal women participating in the Women's Health Initiative.

After an average of almost nine years of follow-up, women with a high Gail score were, overall, 35 percent more likely to develop breast cancer. And for each unit of increase in total hip BMD, a woman's risk rose 25 percent.

There was a particularly high increase in risk for women with the highest BMD and Gail scores.

Women with high bone density often are overweight or obese, a condition which elevates their risk of breast cancer and which may well be the common denominator, said Dr. Jay Brooks, chairman of hematology/oncology at Ochsner Health System in Baton Rouge, La.

"This is more information that shows a link in my opinion, between increasing weight, obesity and the development of breast cancer," he added.

But the picture for women remains a complicated one, another expert said. "Even with these additional findings, however, it's still not clear what the precise relationships are between estrogen, bone density and breast cancer," said Dr. Mary Daly, director of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

- Amanda Gardner

More information

Calculate your risk for breast cancer with the Gail Model.



SOURCES: Jay Brooks, chairman, hematology/oncology, Ochsner Health System, Baton Rouge, La.; Mary Daly, M.D., Ph.D., senior vice president, population science, and director, Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia; Sept. 1, 2008, Cancer

Last Updated: July 28, 2008

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