ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
CANCER
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
FITNESS
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
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Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Calculating a woman's bone mineral density appears to shed light on her risk for breast cancer.

A new study has found that high bone mineral density (BMD) predicts a greater likelihood of developing breast cancer, independent of how high her risk is on the often-used Gail model.

The two measurements together might be used in tandem to better predict breast cancer risk, the researchers said.

The findings, which were expected to be published in the Sept. 1 issue of Cancer, follow closely on the heels of other research linking different aspects of bone health with breast cancer risk. One study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in May found that Zometa (zoledronic acid), a drug used to treat osteoporosis, lowered the risk of breast cancer recurrence in premenopausal women.

And another study released this spring found that women with breast cancer who have a vitamin D deficiency at the time of their diagnosis were more likely to have a recurrence or to die from their disease. Vitamin D is also critical to bone health.

The Gail model incorporates information on family history, age and other factors to estimate a woman's risk of breast cancer over five years and over her lifetime. The model does not, however, include data on bone mineral density, which is known to be a risk factor for breast cancer.

This study, led by researchers at the University of Arizona, Tucson, incorporated Gail scores and hip BMD information on almost 10,000 postmenopausal women participating in the Women's Health Initiative.

After an average of almost nine years of follow-up, women with a high Gail score were, overall, 35 percent more likely to develop breast cancer. And for each unit of increase in total hip BMD, a woman's risk rose 25 percent.

There was a particularly high increase in risk for women with the highest BMD and Gail scores.

Women with high bone density often are overweight or obese, a condition which elevates their risk of breast cancer and which may well be the common denominator, said Dr. Jay Brooks, chairman of hematology/oncology at Ochsner Health System in Baton Rouge, La.

"This is more information that shows a link in my opinion, between increasing weight, obesity and the development of breast cancer," he added.

But the picture for women remains a complicated one, another expert said. "Even with these additional findings, however, it's still not clear what the precise relationships are between estrogen, bone density and breast cancer," said Dr. Mary Daly, director of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

- Amanda Gardner

More information

Calculate your risk for breast cancer with the Gail Model.



SOURCES: Jay Brooks, chairman, hematology/oncology, Ochsner Health System, Baton Rouge, La.; Mary Daly, M.D., Ph.D., senior vice president, population science, and director, Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia; Sept. 1, 2008, Cancer

Last Updated: July 28, 2008

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