ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
Vest Monitors 'Individual' Air Pollution
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
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Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Calculating a woman's bone mineral density appears to shed light on her risk for breast cancer.

A new study has found that high bone mineral density (BMD) predicts a greater likelihood of developing breast cancer, independent of how high her risk is on the often-used Gail model.

The two measurements together might be used in tandem to better predict breast cancer risk, the researchers said.

The findings, which were expected to be published in the Sept. 1 issue of Cancer, follow closely on the heels of other research linking different aspects of bone health with breast cancer risk. One study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in May found that Zometa (zoledronic acid), a drug used to treat osteoporosis, lowered the risk of breast cancer recurrence in premenopausal women.

And another study released this spring found that women with breast cancer who have a vitamin D deficiency at the time of their diagnosis were more likely to have a recurrence or to die from their disease. Vitamin D is also critical to bone health.

The Gail model incorporates information on family history, age and other factors to estimate a woman's risk of breast cancer over five years and over her lifetime. The model does not, however, include data on bone mineral density, which is known to be a risk factor for breast cancer.

This study, led by researchers at the University of Arizona, Tucson, incorporated Gail scores and hip BMD information on almost 10,000 postmenopausal women participating in the Women's Health Initiative.

After an average of almost nine years of follow-up, women with a high Gail score were, overall, 35 percent more likely to develop breast cancer. And for each unit of increase in total hip BMD, a woman's risk rose 25 percent.

There was a particularly high increase in risk for women with the highest BMD and Gail scores.

Women with high bone density often are overweight or obese, a condition which elevates their risk of breast cancer and which may well be the common denominator, said Dr. Jay Brooks, chairman of hematology/oncology at Ochsner Health System in Baton Rouge, La.

"This is more information that shows a link in my opinion, between increasing weight, obesity and the development of breast cancer," he added.

But the picture for women remains a complicated one, another expert said. "Even with these additional findings, however, it's still not clear what the precise relationships are between estrogen, bone density and breast cancer," said Dr. Mary Daly, director of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

- Amanda Gardner

More information

Calculate your risk for breast cancer with the Gail Model.



SOURCES: Jay Brooks, chairman, hematology/oncology, Ochsner Health System, Baton Rouge, La.; Mary Daly, M.D., Ph.D., senior vice president, population science, and director, Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia; Sept. 1, 2008, Cancer

Last Updated: July 28, 2008

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