ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
Eating Free Range
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Eat Light - Live Longer
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
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Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of people who are age 65 and older will double from 7 to 14 percent of the world's total population by 2040, says a new U.S. Census Bureau study.

The over-65 population worldwide will grow from 506 million as of last year to 1.3 billion in 30 years. The unprecedented rate of increase will present challenges and opportunities, according to the report, commissioned by the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

And the number of people 100 and older -- centenarians -- has risen dramatically, from an estimated few thousand in 1950 to more than 340,000 worldwide today; the greatest numbers of centenarians are found in the United States and Japan, according to the latest Census Bureau figures.

"Aging is affecting every country in every part of the world," Richard Suzman, director of the behavioral and social research at the institute, said in an agency news release. "While there are important differences between developed and developing countries, global aging is changing the social and economic nature of the planet and presenting difficult challenges. The fact that, within 10 years, for the first time in human history there will be more people aged 65 and older than children under 5 in the world underlines the extent of this change."

The report, "An Aging World: 2008," found that:

* The current growth rate of the older population in developing countries is more than double that in developed countries and double that of the total world population.
* Currently, 313 million (62 percent) of the world's people age 65 and older live in developing countries. By 2040, that will increase to more than 1 billion people, or 76 percent of the projected world population.
* In many countries, people 80 and older are the fastest growing portion of the population. Between 2008 and 2040, that segment of the population is projected to increase 233 percent, compared with 160 percent for those age 65 and older, and 33 percent for the total world population.
* In China and India, there are 166 million people age 65 and older, nearly a third of the world's total. That number will increase to 551 million by 2040 -- 329 million in China and 222 million in India.
* In 2005, childlessness among American and European women age 65 ranged from less than eight percent in the Czech Republic to 15 percent in Austria and Italy. In the United States in 2006, 20 percent of women ages 40 to 44 had no biological children. The researchers said the data raises questions about who will care for these people when they're elderly.

SOURCES: U.S. National Institutes of Health, news release, July 20, 2009 Published on: July 20, 2009