ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Run for Your Life
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Add your Article

Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide

MONDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of people who are age 65 and older will double from 7 to 14 percent of the world's total population by 2040, says a new U.S. Census Bureau study.

The over-65 population worldwide will grow from 506 million as of last year to 1.3 billion in 30 years. The unprecedented rate of increase will present challenges and opportunities, according to the report, commissioned by the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

And the number of people 100 and older -- centenarians -- has risen dramatically, from an estimated few thousand in 1950 to more than 340,000 worldwide today; the greatest numbers of centenarians are found in the United States and Japan, according to the latest Census Bureau figures.

"Aging is affecting every country in every part of the world," Richard Suzman, director of the behavioral and social research at the institute, said in an agency news release. "While there are important differences between developed and developing countries, global aging is changing the social and economic nature of the planet and presenting difficult challenges. The fact that, within 10 years, for the first time in human history there will be more people aged 65 and older than children under 5 in the world underlines the extent of this change."

The report, "An Aging World: 2008," found that:

* The current growth rate of the older population in developing countries is more than double that in developed countries and double that of the total world population.
* Currently, 313 million (62 percent) of the world's people age 65 and older live in developing countries. By 2040, that will increase to more than 1 billion people, or 76 percent of the projected world population.
* In many countries, people 80 and older are the fastest growing portion of the population. Between 2008 and 2040, that segment of the population is projected to increase 233 percent, compared with 160 percent for those age 65 and older, and 33 percent for the total world population.
* In China and India, there are 166 million people age 65 and older, nearly a third of the world's total. That number will increase to 551 million by 2040 -- 329 million in China and 222 million in India.
* In 2005, childlessness among American and European women age 65 ranged from less than eight percent in the Czech Republic to 15 percent in Austria and Italy. In the United States in 2006, 20 percent of women ages 40 to 44 had no biological children. The researchers said the data raises questions about who will care for these people when they're elderly.

SOURCES: U.S. National Institutes of Health, news release, July 20, 2009 Published on: July 20, 2009