ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
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Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good

New research suggests that extra vitamin D could make a major difference in heart disease risk among people who have low levels of the nutrient.

Researchers from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah, report in two new studies that vitamin D supplementation may reduce the risk of other chronic diseases, too.

"Vitamin D replacement therapy has long been associated with reducing the risk of fractures and diseases of the bone," study author Dr. J. Brent Muhlestein, director of cardiovascular research, said in a center news release. "But our findings show that vitamin D could have far greater implications in the treatment and reduction of cardiovascular disease and other chronic conditions than we previously thought."

The researchers found that patients who boosted their vitamin D levels to 43 nanograms per milliliter of blood or higher reduced their rates of diabetes, heart attack, heart failure, high blood pressure and heart disease. They were also less likely to die during the study period.

According to the researchers, a level of 30 nanograms per milliliter of vitamin D is considered normal.

"Although randomized trials would be useful and are coming, I feel there is enough information here for me to start treatment based on these findings," Muhlestein said, adding that increasing vitamin D intake by 1,000 to 5,000 international units a day may be a good idea in some cases.

The findings are scheduled to be presented Monday at the American College of Cardiology's annual meeting in Atlanta.

SOURCE: Intermountain Medical Center, press release, March 15, 2010.

Last Updated: March 15, 2010