ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
CANCER
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
More Single Women Are Having Babies
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Men are more likely than women to suffer vision loss as a result of a condition that causes increased pressure in the brain, a U.S. study finds.

People with the condition, known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), have too much cerebrospinal fluid pressure, which can cause severe headaches, a whooshing noise in the ears, swelling of the optic nerves, double vision, and vision loss. The condition affects about one in 5,000 people, and is more common in women.

Study author Dr. Beau Bruce, of Emory University in Atlanta, and colleagues reviewed the medical records of 721 people with IIH. Only 9 percent of the patients were male, but they were two times more likely than female patients to suffer severe vision problems in one or both eyes.

"While IIH occurs less often in men, their increased frequency of severe vision loss compared to women is a major concern," Bruce said in an American Academy of Neurology news release. "Our findings suggest that men with this condition should have more careful monitoring of their eyesight and likely should be treated more aggressively when they do have evidence of vision loss."

The researchers also found that male patients with IIH were more likely than female patients to have diagnosed sleep apnea. More prospective studies are needed to examine the link between sleep apnea and IIH, but doctors should consider referring all IIH patients for sleep studies, Bruce said.

The study was published in the Oct. 15 online edition of Neurology.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about intracranial hypertension.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Neurology, news release, Oct. 15, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2008

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