ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
CAREGIVING
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
After Job Loss, People Report More Health Issues
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Any Old Cane Won't Do
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
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Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Men are more likely than women to suffer vision loss as a result of a condition that causes increased pressure in the brain, a U.S. study finds.

People with the condition, known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), have too much cerebrospinal fluid pressure, which can cause severe headaches, a whooshing noise in the ears, swelling of the optic nerves, double vision, and vision loss. The condition affects about one in 5,000 people, and is more common in women.

Study author Dr. Beau Bruce, of Emory University in Atlanta, and colleagues reviewed the medical records of 721 people with IIH. Only 9 percent of the patients were male, but they were two times more likely than female patients to suffer severe vision problems in one or both eyes.

"While IIH occurs less often in men, their increased frequency of severe vision loss compared to women is a major concern," Bruce said in an American Academy of Neurology news release. "Our findings suggest that men with this condition should have more careful monitoring of their eyesight and likely should be treated more aggressively when they do have evidence of vision loss."

The researchers also found that male patients with IIH were more likely than female patients to have diagnosed sleep apnea. More prospective studies are needed to examine the link between sleep apnea and IIH, but doctors should consider referring all IIH patients for sleep studies, Bruce said.

The study was published in the Oct. 15 online edition of Neurology.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about intracranial hypertension.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Neurology, news release, Oct. 15, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 15, 2008

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