ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
CANCER
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Green Tea May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
EYE CARE, VISION
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Go To Work But Skip The Car
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Add your Article

Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling

THURSDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- Women were 10 times more likely to do breast self-examinations if they took part in an brief intervention program that included one counseling session and two follow-up phone calls, a U.S. study has found.

The research involved more than 600 women, ages 40 to 70, who'd had a negative mammogram screening in the previous two months. They were given either dietary counseling with no mention of breast self-exams or a 30- to 45-minute counseling session about breast self-exam that included an educational video, practicing self-exam on a silicone model and a discussion of possible barriers to doing self-exams. This group also received follow-up phone calls one and two months later.

Before the study began, about 6 percent of the participants were doing at least five-minute self-exams every month using proper techniques.

A year later, 59 percent of the women in the self-exam counseling group were performing adequate self-exams, compared with 12 percent of those in the dietary counseling group.

"Many women avoid breast self-exams, because they are worried about doing them correctly," the study's lead author, Nangel Lindberg, an investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore., said in a Kaiser news release. "However, our study showed that with a relatively simple intervention, women can learn the proper technique. And once they feel confident, they will continue to do their exams."

Self-exams are one way for women "to participate in their own health care," Lindberg said. "Self-exams allow women to become familiar with their breasts, so they can report any changes to their health-care providers."

The study is in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Early detection is an important factor in the success of breast cancer treatment. Each year in the United States, more than 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer, and nearly 40,000 die of the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

More information

The U.S. National Women's Health Information Center has more about breast self-exams.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Kaiser Permanente, news release, April 30, 2009

Last Updated: April 30, 2009

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