ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
The Unmedicated Mind
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling

THURSDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- Women were 10 times more likely to do breast self-examinations if they took part in an brief intervention program that included one counseling session and two follow-up phone calls, a U.S. study has found.

The research involved more than 600 women, ages 40 to 70, who'd had a negative mammogram screening in the previous two months. They were given either dietary counseling with no mention of breast self-exams or a 30- to 45-minute counseling session about breast self-exam that included an educational video, practicing self-exam on a silicone model and a discussion of possible barriers to doing self-exams. This group also received follow-up phone calls one and two months later.

Before the study began, about 6 percent of the participants were doing at least five-minute self-exams every month using proper techniques.

A year later, 59 percent of the women in the self-exam counseling group were performing adequate self-exams, compared with 12 percent of those in the dietary counseling group.

"Many women avoid breast self-exams, because they are worried about doing them correctly," the study's lead author, Nangel Lindberg, an investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore., said in a Kaiser news release. "However, our study showed that with a relatively simple intervention, women can learn the proper technique. And once they feel confident, they will continue to do their exams."

Self-exams are one way for women "to participate in their own health care," Lindberg said. "Self-exams allow women to become familiar with their breasts, so they can report any changes to their health-care providers."

The study is in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Early detection is an important factor in the success of breast cancer treatment. Each year in the United States, more than 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer, and nearly 40,000 die of the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

More information

The U.S. National Women's Health Information Center has more about breast self-exams.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Kaiser Permanente, news release, April 30, 2009

Last Updated: April 30, 2009

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