ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
CAREGIVING
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
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Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling

THURSDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- Women were 10 times more likely to do breast self-examinations if they took part in an brief intervention program that included one counseling session and two follow-up phone calls, a U.S. study has found.

The research involved more than 600 women, ages 40 to 70, who'd had a negative mammogram screening in the previous two months. They were given either dietary counseling with no mention of breast self-exams or a 30- to 45-minute counseling session about breast self-exam that included an educational video, practicing self-exam on a silicone model and a discussion of possible barriers to doing self-exams. This group also received follow-up phone calls one and two months later.

Before the study began, about 6 percent of the participants were doing at least five-minute self-exams every month using proper techniques.

A year later, 59 percent of the women in the self-exam counseling group were performing adequate self-exams, compared with 12 percent of those in the dietary counseling group.

"Many women avoid breast self-exams, because they are worried about doing them correctly," the study's lead author, Nangel Lindberg, an investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Ore., said in a Kaiser news release. "However, our study showed that with a relatively simple intervention, women can learn the proper technique. And once they feel confident, they will continue to do their exams."

Self-exams are one way for women "to participate in their own health care," Lindberg said. "Self-exams allow women to become familiar with their breasts, so they can report any changes to their health-care providers."

The study is in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Early detection is an important factor in the success of breast cancer treatment. Each year in the United States, more than 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer, and nearly 40,000 die of the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

More information

The U.S. National Women's Health Information Center has more about breast self-exams.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Kaiser Permanente, news release, April 30, 2009

Last Updated: April 30, 2009

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