ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
CANCER
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Add your Article

Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention

Substituting brown rice or another whole grain for white rice can help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, new research suggests.

Five or more servings of white rice a week increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 17 percent, according to the study, which is published in the June 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. But replacing white rice with brown rice could reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 16 percent, the study found.

"This is an important message for public health. White rice is potentially harmful for the risk of type 2 diabetes," said the study's lead author, Dr. Qi Sun, an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a researcher at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

"Over the last decade, rice consumption in the U.S. has really increased a lot, but more than 70 percent of the rice consumed is white rice," said Sun, who added, "People should replace white rice with brown rice or whole grains."

The reason that brown rice may offer some protection, according to Sun, is that it still contains many of the nutrients and fiber that are stripped away in the production of white rice. During the refining and milling process necessary to make white rice, the rice loses a significant amount of its fiber and most of the vitamins and minerals, according to the study.

"When you have just the white rice, it's mostly protein and starch, and you're making freer carbohydrates that are easy to digest," said Dr. Jacob Warman, chief of endocrinology at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City.

"With white rice, the digestive enzymes can more easily penetrate the rice grains and release the starch for digestion. After ingesting white rice, blood sugar increases more rapidly," Sun said.

To analyze how those differences affect the body over the long term, Sun and his colleagues culled data from three different studies involving nearly 200,000 participants. The studies (Health Professionals Follow-up Study and the Nurses' Health Study I and II) included 39,765 men and 157,463 women, and contained detailed data on dietary intake that was updated every four years over a 14- to 22-year follow-up.

After adjusting the data to control for many other factors that could contribute to type 2 diabetes -- such as body mass index, family history, age and other dietary habits -- the researchers found that the consumption of white rice was associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while regular consumption of brown rice was linked to a reduced risk.

People who ate at least five servings of white rice a week had a 17 percent increased risk of type 2 diabetes, while those who ate at least two servings of brown rice a week reduced their risk of type 2 diabetes by 11 percent.

The researchers estimate that if people replaced white rice with brown rice, the risk of type 2 diabetes would go down by 16 percent.

One problem Sun and his colleagues discovered while doing the study was that brown rice consumption was relatively low during the study period. It's only in recent years that brown rice is becoming more popular. So, the researchers also evaluated the effect that replacing white rice with whole grains would have and found that the risk of diabetes would be 36 percent lower.

"There was a very strong association between whole grains and a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. We recommend replacing white rice with brown rice or other whole grains," said Sun.

"In general, bulking up on grains is a good idea, and this -- switching to brown rice from white -- is such an easy substitution to make," said Warman.

SOURCES: Qi Sun, M.D., Sc.D., researcher, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and instructor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston; Jacob Warman, M.D., chief of endocrinology, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, New York City; June 14, 2010, Archives of Internal Medicine