ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
CANCER
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Add your Article

Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention

Substituting brown rice or another whole grain for white rice can help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, new research suggests.

Five or more servings of white rice a week increased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 17 percent, according to the study, which is published in the June 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. But replacing white rice with brown rice could reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 16 percent, the study found.

"This is an important message for public health. White rice is potentially harmful for the risk of type 2 diabetes," said the study's lead author, Dr. Qi Sun, an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a researcher at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

"Over the last decade, rice consumption in the U.S. has really increased a lot, but more than 70 percent of the rice consumed is white rice," said Sun, who added, "People should replace white rice with brown rice or whole grains."

The reason that brown rice may offer some protection, according to Sun, is that it still contains many of the nutrients and fiber that are stripped away in the production of white rice. During the refining and milling process necessary to make white rice, the rice loses a significant amount of its fiber and most of the vitamins and minerals, according to the study.

"When you have just the white rice, it's mostly protein and starch, and you're making freer carbohydrates that are easy to digest," said Dr. Jacob Warman, chief of endocrinology at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City.

"With white rice, the digestive enzymes can more easily penetrate the rice grains and release the starch for digestion. After ingesting white rice, blood sugar increases more rapidly," Sun said.

To analyze how those differences affect the body over the long term, Sun and his colleagues culled data from three different studies involving nearly 200,000 participants. The studies (Health Professionals Follow-up Study and the Nurses' Health Study I and II) included 39,765 men and 157,463 women, and contained detailed data on dietary intake that was updated every four years over a 14- to 22-year follow-up.

After adjusting the data to control for many other factors that could contribute to type 2 diabetes -- such as body mass index, family history, age and other dietary habits -- the researchers found that the consumption of white rice was associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while regular consumption of brown rice was linked to a reduced risk.

People who ate at least five servings of white rice a week had a 17 percent increased risk of type 2 diabetes, while those who ate at least two servings of brown rice a week reduced their risk of type 2 diabetes by 11 percent.

The researchers estimate that if people replaced white rice with brown rice, the risk of type 2 diabetes would go down by 16 percent.

One problem Sun and his colleagues discovered while doing the study was that brown rice consumption was relatively low during the study period. It's only in recent years that brown rice is becoming more popular. So, the researchers also evaluated the effect that replacing white rice with whole grains would have and found that the risk of diabetes would be 36 percent lower.

"There was a very strong association between whole grains and a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. We recommend replacing white rice with brown rice or other whole grains," said Sun.

"In general, bulking up on grains is a good idea, and this -- switching to brown rice from white -- is such an easy substitution to make," said Warman.

SOURCES: Qi Sun, M.D., Sc.D., researcher, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and instructor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston; Jacob Warman, M.D., chief of endocrinology, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, New York City; June 14, 2010, Archives of Internal Medicine