ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
FITNESS
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Add your Article

Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Preteens who were bullied persistently when they were younger are more likely than others their age to have hallucinations, delusions or other psychotic symptoms, British researchers report.

Their study involved 6,437 youths, who averaged just less than 13 years old. Their parents had provided regular updates about the youngsters' health and development since birth, and the children had undergone yearly physical and psychological assessments since age 7.

About 46 percent of the youngsters experienced bullying at ages 8 or 10. As their neared 13, about 14 percent of the children had broad psychosis-like symptoms (one or more symptoms suspected or confirmed), 11 percent had intermediate symptoms (one or more symptoms suspected or present at times other than when going to sleep, waking from sleep, during a fever or after substance use) and 6 percent had narrow symptoms (one or more symptoms confirmed).

Children who were bullied at either ages 8 or 10 were about twice as likely as other children to have psychotic symptoms. The risk was highest in preteens who'd suffered chronic or severe bullying.

"Whether repeated victimization experiences alter cognitive and affective processing or re-program stress response, or whether psychotic symptoms are more likely due to genetic predisposition still needs to be determined in further research," wrote Andrea Schreier, of Warwick Medical School in Coventry, England, and colleagues.

"A major implication is that chronic or severe peer victimization has non-trivial, adverse, long-term consequences," they wrote. "Reduction of peer victimization and of the resulting stress caused to victims could be a worthwhile target for prevention and early intervention efforts for common mental health problems and psychosis."

The study appears in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

More information

The Center for Mental Health Services has more about bullying.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 08, 2009

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