ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
CANCER
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Get to Know the Pap Test
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
CAREGIVING
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Good Sleepers More Likely to Eat Right
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Add your Article

Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Preteens who were bullied persistently when they were younger are more likely than others their age to have hallucinations, delusions or other psychotic symptoms, British researchers report.

Their study involved 6,437 youths, who averaged just less than 13 years old. Their parents had provided regular updates about the youngsters' health and development since birth, and the children had undergone yearly physical and psychological assessments since age 7.

About 46 percent of the youngsters experienced bullying at ages 8 or 10. As their neared 13, about 14 percent of the children had broad psychosis-like symptoms (one or more symptoms suspected or confirmed), 11 percent had intermediate symptoms (one or more symptoms suspected or present at times other than when going to sleep, waking from sleep, during a fever or after substance use) and 6 percent had narrow symptoms (one or more symptoms confirmed).

Children who were bullied at either ages 8 or 10 were about twice as likely as other children to have psychotic symptoms. The risk was highest in preteens who'd suffered chronic or severe bullying.

"Whether repeated victimization experiences alter cognitive and affective processing or re-program stress response, or whether psychotic symptoms are more likely due to genetic predisposition still needs to be determined in further research," wrote Andrea Schreier, of Warwick Medical School in Coventry, England, and colleagues.

"A major implication is that chronic or severe peer victimization has non-trivial, adverse, long-term consequences," they wrote. "Reduction of peer victimization and of the resulting stress caused to victims could be a worthwhile target for prevention and early intervention efforts for common mental health problems and psychosis."

The study appears in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

More information

The Center for Mental Health Services has more about bullying.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 08, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com