ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Add your Article

Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Preteens who were bullied persistently when they were younger are more likely than others their age to have hallucinations, delusions or other psychotic symptoms, British researchers report.

Their study involved 6,437 youths, who averaged just less than 13 years old. Their parents had provided regular updates about the youngsters' health and development since birth, and the children had undergone yearly physical and psychological assessments since age 7.

About 46 percent of the youngsters experienced bullying at ages 8 or 10. As their neared 13, about 14 percent of the children had broad psychosis-like symptoms (one or more symptoms suspected or confirmed), 11 percent had intermediate symptoms (one or more symptoms suspected or present at times other than when going to sleep, waking from sleep, during a fever or after substance use) and 6 percent had narrow symptoms (one or more symptoms confirmed).

Children who were bullied at either ages 8 or 10 were about twice as likely as other children to have psychotic symptoms. The risk was highest in preteens who'd suffered chronic or severe bullying.

"Whether repeated victimization experiences alter cognitive and affective processing or re-program stress response, or whether psychotic symptoms are more likely due to genetic predisposition still needs to be determined in further research," wrote Andrea Schreier, of Warwick Medical School in Coventry, England, and colleagues.

"A major implication is that chronic or severe peer victimization has non-trivial, adverse, long-term consequences," they wrote. "Reduction of peer victimization and of the resulting stress caused to victims could be a worthwhile target for prevention and early intervention efforts for common mental health problems and psychosis."

The study appears in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

More information

The Center for Mental Health Services has more about bullying.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 08, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com