ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
CANCER
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
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Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Preteens who were bullied persistently when they were younger are more likely than others their age to have hallucinations, delusions or other psychotic symptoms, British researchers report.

Their study involved 6,437 youths, who averaged just less than 13 years old. Their parents had provided regular updates about the youngsters' health and development since birth, and the children had undergone yearly physical and psychological assessments since age 7.

About 46 percent of the youngsters experienced bullying at ages 8 or 10. As their neared 13, about 14 percent of the children had broad psychosis-like symptoms (one or more symptoms suspected or confirmed), 11 percent had intermediate symptoms (one or more symptoms suspected or present at times other than when going to sleep, waking from sleep, during a fever or after substance use) and 6 percent had narrow symptoms (one or more symptoms confirmed).

Children who were bullied at either ages 8 or 10 were about twice as likely as other children to have psychotic symptoms. The risk was highest in preteens who'd suffered chronic or severe bullying.

"Whether repeated victimization experiences alter cognitive and affective processing or re-program stress response, or whether psychotic symptoms are more likely due to genetic predisposition still needs to be determined in further research," wrote Andrea Schreier, of Warwick Medical School in Coventry, England, and colleagues.

"A major implication is that chronic or severe peer victimization has non-trivial, adverse, long-term consequences," they wrote. "Reduction of peer victimization and of the resulting stress caused to victims could be a worthwhile target for prevention and early intervention efforts for common mental health problems and psychosis."

The study appears in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

More information

The Center for Mental Health Services has more about bullying.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 4, 2009

Last Updated: May 08, 2009

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