ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Should the FDA Regulate Tobacco?
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
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Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Even consuming low amounts of caffeine during pregnancy may increase the risk of having a low birth weight baby, new research shows.

British researchers studied 2,645 pregnant women, average age 30, with low-risk pregnancies.

Their average caffeine intake during pregnancy was 159 milligrams a day, much lower than the 300 mg/day recommended by the U.K.'s Food Standards Agency. Tea was the main source of caffeine (62 percent), followed by coffee (14 percent), cola (12 percent), chocolate (8 percent), and soft drinks (2 percent).

Most of the women's babies were born at full term with an average birth weight of 3,450 grams (around the U.K. average), while 4 percent of the babies were born prematurely, 0.3 percent were stillborn, and 0.7 percent were miscarried late.

Dr. Justin Konje and colleagues at the University of Leicester and the University of Leeds concluded that higher caffeine intake was associated with increased risk of low birth weight. Compared to women who consumed less than 100 mg/day of caffeine (equivalent of less than one cup of coffee), the risk of having a lower birth weight baby increased by 20 percent for women who had 100-199 mg/day, by 50 percent for those who consumed 200-299 mg/day, and by 40 percent for over 300 mg/day.

Caffeine consumption of more than 100 mg/day was associated with a fetal weight reduction of 34-59 grams in the first trimester, 24-74g in the second trimester, and 66-89g in the third trimester. The effect was significant and consistent across all trimesters with caffeine consumption of more than 200 mg/day. The link between caffeine and low birth weight was strongest in women who metabolized caffeine more quickly.

Pregnant women should significantly reduce their caffeine consumption before and during pregnancy, the researchers said. The study was published online in the British Medical Journal.

The study reinforces concerns that caffeine may affect fetal growth, but the authors' warning could unnecessarily frighten women who've consumed some caffeine during pregnancy, Professor Jorn Olsen, of the department of epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health, and a colleague wrote in an accompanying editorial.

They did agree that pregnant women should reduce their caffeine consumption, but must not replace it with unhealthy alternatives such as alcoholic drinks or soft drinks full of sugar.

More information

The March of Dimes has more about caffeine during pregnancy.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: British Medical Journal, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

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