ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
CAREGIVING
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
FITNESS
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Add your Article

Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Even consuming low amounts of caffeine during pregnancy may increase the risk of having a low birth weight baby, new research shows.

British researchers studied 2,645 pregnant women, average age 30, with low-risk pregnancies.

Their average caffeine intake during pregnancy was 159 milligrams a day, much lower than the 300 mg/day recommended by the U.K.'s Food Standards Agency. Tea was the main source of caffeine (62 percent), followed by coffee (14 percent), cola (12 percent), chocolate (8 percent), and soft drinks (2 percent).

Most of the women's babies were born at full term with an average birth weight of 3,450 grams (around the U.K. average), while 4 percent of the babies were born prematurely, 0.3 percent were stillborn, and 0.7 percent were miscarried late.

Dr. Justin Konje and colleagues at the University of Leicester and the University of Leeds concluded that higher caffeine intake was associated with increased risk of low birth weight. Compared to women who consumed less than 100 mg/day of caffeine (equivalent of less than one cup of coffee), the risk of having a lower birth weight baby increased by 20 percent for women who had 100-199 mg/day, by 50 percent for those who consumed 200-299 mg/day, and by 40 percent for over 300 mg/day.

Caffeine consumption of more than 100 mg/day was associated with a fetal weight reduction of 34-59 grams in the first trimester, 24-74g in the second trimester, and 66-89g in the third trimester. The effect was significant and consistent across all trimesters with caffeine consumption of more than 200 mg/day. The link between caffeine and low birth weight was strongest in women who metabolized caffeine more quickly.

Pregnant women should significantly reduce their caffeine consumption before and during pregnancy, the researchers said. The study was published online in the British Medical Journal.

The study reinforces concerns that caffeine may affect fetal growth, but the authors' warning could unnecessarily frighten women who've consumed some caffeine during pregnancy, Professor Jorn Olsen, of the department of epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health, and a colleague wrote in an accompanying editorial.

They did agree that pregnant women should reduce their caffeine consumption, but must not replace it with unhealthy alternatives such as alcoholic drinks or soft drinks full of sugar.

More information

The March of Dimes has more about caffeine during pregnancy.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: British Medical Journal, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

Copyright Š 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com