ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
CANCER
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
HELP TO LOSE WEIGHT ON A LOW CAL BUDGET
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Maximize Your Run
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Internet Program Helps Problem Drinkers
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
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Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Even consuming low amounts of caffeine during pregnancy may increase the risk of having a low birth weight baby, new research shows.

British researchers studied 2,645 pregnant women, average age 30, with low-risk pregnancies.

Their average caffeine intake during pregnancy was 159 milligrams a day, much lower than the 300 mg/day recommended by the U.K.'s Food Standards Agency. Tea was the main source of caffeine (62 percent), followed by coffee (14 percent), cola (12 percent), chocolate (8 percent), and soft drinks (2 percent).

Most of the women's babies were born at full term with an average birth weight of 3,450 grams (around the U.K. average), while 4 percent of the babies were born prematurely, 0.3 percent were stillborn, and 0.7 percent were miscarried late.

Dr. Justin Konje and colleagues at the University of Leicester and the University of Leeds concluded that higher caffeine intake was associated with increased risk of low birth weight. Compared to women who consumed less than 100 mg/day of caffeine (equivalent of less than one cup of coffee), the risk of having a lower birth weight baby increased by 20 percent for women who had 100-199 mg/day, by 50 percent for those who consumed 200-299 mg/day, and by 40 percent for over 300 mg/day.

Caffeine consumption of more than 100 mg/day was associated with a fetal weight reduction of 34-59 grams in the first trimester, 24-74g in the second trimester, and 66-89g in the third trimester. The effect was significant and consistent across all trimesters with caffeine consumption of more than 200 mg/day. The link between caffeine and low birth weight was strongest in women who metabolized caffeine more quickly.

Pregnant women should significantly reduce their caffeine consumption before and during pregnancy, the researchers said. The study was published online in the British Medical Journal.

The study reinforces concerns that caffeine may affect fetal growth, but the authors' warning could unnecessarily frighten women who've consumed some caffeine during pregnancy, Professor Jorn Olsen, of the department of epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Public Health, and a colleague wrote in an accompanying editorial.

They did agree that pregnant women should reduce their caffeine consumption, but must not replace it with unhealthy alternatives such as alcoholic drinks or soft drinks full of sugar.

More information

The March of Dimes has more about caffeine during pregnancy.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: British Medical Journal, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

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