ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Add your Article

Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy

THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- High daily doses of calcium supplements may reduce lead levels in the blood of pregnant women and cut down on fetal and infant exposure, a new report suggests.

The study, published online in Environmental Health Perspectives, found that women who take 1,200 milligrams of calcium daily have up to a 31 percent reduction in lead levels.

Women who used lead-glazed ceramics or with high bone lead levels showed the largest reductions, while the average reduction was about 11 percent.

"We and others have previously shown that during pregnancy, mothers can transfer lead from their bones to their unborn -- with significant adverse consequences -- making maternal bone lead stores a threat even if current environmental lead exposures are low," principal investigator Howard Hu, chairman of the University of Michigan's Department of Environmental Health Sciences, said in a news release issued by the school. "This study demonstrates that dietary calcium supplementation during pregnancy may constitute a low-cost and low-risk approach for reducing this threat."

Exposure to lead during fetal development and infancy can cause low birth weight or slow weight gain after birth, cognitive defects such as lower intelligence scores, lower motor and visual skills, or even miscarriage. Damage from lead exposure and poisoning is usually permanent, the researchers said.

Bone lead can stay in the body for decades, and the fetus or nursing infant can still be at great risk from maternal stores of lead even with minimal environmental exposure, the researchers said.

"The bottom line is that obstetricians and pediatricians should consider adding calcium supplementation to the prenatal vitamins normally recommended in pregnant women, particularly if their patients have a significant history of environmental or occupational lead exposure," Hu said.

The study, conducted with 557 mostly low- to moderate-income women recruited from Mexican prenatal clinics, found reductions in blood lead levels were more evident in the second trimester (14 percent) than in the third trimester (8 percent).

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about lead poisoning.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Michigan School of Public Health, news release, Sept. 10, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 18, 2008

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