ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Kids More Apt to Smoke If Mom Did While Pregnant
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy

THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- High daily doses of calcium supplements may reduce lead levels in the blood of pregnant women and cut down on fetal and infant exposure, a new report suggests.

The study, published online in Environmental Health Perspectives, found that women who take 1,200 milligrams of calcium daily have up to a 31 percent reduction in lead levels.

Women who used lead-glazed ceramics or with high bone lead levels showed the largest reductions, while the average reduction was about 11 percent.

"We and others have previously shown that during pregnancy, mothers can transfer lead from their bones to their unborn -- with significant adverse consequences -- making maternal bone lead stores a threat even if current environmental lead exposures are low," principal investigator Howard Hu, chairman of the University of Michigan's Department of Environmental Health Sciences, said in a news release issued by the school. "This study demonstrates that dietary calcium supplementation during pregnancy may constitute a low-cost and low-risk approach for reducing this threat."

Exposure to lead during fetal development and infancy can cause low birth weight or slow weight gain after birth, cognitive defects such as lower intelligence scores, lower motor and visual skills, or even miscarriage. Damage from lead exposure and poisoning is usually permanent, the researchers said.

Bone lead can stay in the body for decades, and the fetus or nursing infant can still be at great risk from maternal stores of lead even with minimal environmental exposure, the researchers said.

"The bottom line is that obstetricians and pediatricians should consider adding calcium supplementation to the prenatal vitamins normally recommended in pregnant women, particularly if their patients have a significant history of environmental or occupational lead exposure," Hu said.

The study, conducted with 557 mostly low- to moderate-income women recruited from Mexican prenatal clinics, found reductions in blood lead levels were more evident in the second trimester (14 percent) than in the third trimester (8 percent).

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about lead poisoning.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Michigan School of Public Health, news release, Sept. 10, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 18, 2008

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