ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
The Unmedicated Mind
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Add your Article

Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy

THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- High daily doses of calcium supplements may reduce lead levels in the blood of pregnant women and cut down on fetal and infant exposure, a new report suggests.

The study, published online in Environmental Health Perspectives, found that women who take 1,200 milligrams of calcium daily have up to a 31 percent reduction in lead levels.

Women who used lead-glazed ceramics or with high bone lead levels showed the largest reductions, while the average reduction was about 11 percent.

"We and others have previously shown that during pregnancy, mothers can transfer lead from their bones to their unborn -- with significant adverse consequences -- making maternal bone lead stores a threat even if current environmental lead exposures are low," principal investigator Howard Hu, chairman of the University of Michigan's Department of Environmental Health Sciences, said in a news release issued by the school. "This study demonstrates that dietary calcium supplementation during pregnancy may constitute a low-cost and low-risk approach for reducing this threat."

Exposure to lead during fetal development and infancy can cause low birth weight or slow weight gain after birth, cognitive defects such as lower intelligence scores, lower motor and visual skills, or even miscarriage. Damage from lead exposure and poisoning is usually permanent, the researchers said.

Bone lead can stay in the body for decades, and the fetus or nursing infant can still be at great risk from maternal stores of lead even with minimal environmental exposure, the researchers said.

"The bottom line is that obstetricians and pediatricians should consider adding calcium supplementation to the prenatal vitamins normally recommended in pregnant women, particularly if their patients have a significant history of environmental or occupational lead exposure," Hu said.

The study, conducted with 557 mostly low- to moderate-income women recruited from Mexican prenatal clinics, found reductions in blood lead levels were more evident in the second trimester (14 percent) than in the third trimester (8 percent).

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about lead poisoning.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Michigan School of Public Health, news release, Sept. 10, 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 18, 2008

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