ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Probiotics Are The Good Guys
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
The Brain Comes Alive With the Sounds of Music
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Add your Article

Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A, a controversial chemical used to harden plastic packaging for many foods and beverages, may affect human reproduction, researchers report.

Bisphenol A (BPA) could hurt the chances of successful in vitro fertilization, or the ability of embryos to attach to the uterus, according to presentations at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine's annual meeting, which concluded Wednesday in San Francisco.

"The issue of environmental toxicants upon human reproduction is very important," said Dr. Richard J. Paulson, chief of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, who was not involved in the studies.

Last month, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel said the agency had erred when it said that BPA, which is widely used in baby bottles and other plastic packaging for foods and beverages, posed no health risks. The agency said it would probably start research early in 2009 to determine the toxic effects of BPA on babies less than 1 month old.

In the first report, a team led by Dr. Julie Lamb, of the University of California, San Francisco, measured levels of BPA in people going through their first cycle of in vitro fertilization (IVF). Ninety-three percent of the 41 women had measurable BPA levels; among the 31 men, 81 percent had quantifiable levels of the chemical.

The researchers also found there was a small trend among women with measurable BPA levels not to become pregnant.

Paulson doesn't think this finding is proof that BPA can affect the chances of successful in vitro fertilization.

"Most of the women had detectable levels of BPA, indicating that BPA is definitely in the circulation of women undergoing fertility treatment," he said. "However, the significance of this finding is as yet uncertain."

In another presentation, Dr. Shelley Ehrlich of the Harvard School of Public Health and colleagues reported associations between increased Bisphenol A levels in urine and decreased semen quality. But, the associations weren't statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size. The researchers looked at BPA levels in the semen of 71 men and evaluated the quality of the semen, according to an American Society for Reproductive Medicine news release.

Paulson said this finding was "reassuring, although the authors do caution that the study was small, and the results should be considered preliminary."

Commenting on these two studies, Dr. Hugh S. Taylor, director of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the Yale University School of Medicine, noted that the findings didn't reach the level of statistical significance.

"This is not where I suspected to find the defects related to BPA," Taylor said. "BPA seems more powerful as a developmental toxicant," he said, referring to fetal and early childhood development.

In the third study, Dr. Lusine Aghajanova, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco, exposed uterine cells obtained from healthy women to BPA in a range of doses found in the U.S. population.

"We observed that even short-term exposure of those uterine cells to BPA significantly decreases the division of cells," Aghajanova said. "Moreover, our data suggest that BPA can interfere with further development of uterine cells and the way they change in preparation for possible pregnancy."

Exposure to BPA may prevent the embryo from attaching to the uterus, Aghajanova said.

Previous animal experiments have suggested that BPA may mimic the female sex hormone estrogen. The worry has been that exposure to the chemical can cause birth defects and developmental problems in children.

Exposure to BPA also has been suspected of causing a variety of other health problems, including cancer, diabetes, obesity and attention-deficit disorder. BPA exposure can occur through direct contact with the chemical or by exposure to food or drink that has been in contact with material containing BPA.

More information

To learn more about BPA, visit the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.



SOURCES: Lusine Aghajanova, M.D., Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow, University of California, San Francisco; Hugh S. Taylor, M.D., director, division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility, and professor, obstetrics and gynecology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; Richard J. Paulson, M.D., professor, obstetrics and gynecology, and chief, division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles; Nov. 11, 2008, presentations, American Society for Reproductive Medicine annual meeting, San Francisco

Last Updated: Nov. 13, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com