ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Eat Up, But Eat Healthy This Holiday Season
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Smog Tougher on the Obese
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Why Am I So Tired? Could It Be Low Thyroid?
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Adults Need To Get Thier Food Facts Straight
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Add your Article

Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats

SUNDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Call it the "tart heart-smart diet."

New research ties eating tart cherries to lowering cholesterol, reducing inflammation and cutting one's body weight and fat -- all major risk factors for heart disease.

This latest study, scheduled to be presented by University of Michigan researchers at the American Dietetic Association annual meeting, in Chicago, reached these conclusions after feeding whole tart cherry powder to obese rats.

After 12 weeks, the rats had 14 percent less body fat while maintaining lean muscle mass, compared to other rats who ate the same foods minus the cherry powder. The rats eating cherries also lost significant amounts of body weight -- notably a loss of "belly" fat, a known risk for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association.

The rats eating a cherry-enriched diet also dropped their total cholesterol levels by about 11 percent. Levels of two known markers of inflammation linked to increased risk for heart disease also dropped by 31 percent to 40 percent.

"Heart disease is the number one killer of Americans today, so it's important we continue researching ways people can improve their diet to help reduce key risk factors," study co-author Dr. Steven F. Bolling, a cardiac surgeon at the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, said in a news release from the study's sponsor, the Cherry Marketing Institute. "We know excess body fat increases the risk for heart disease. This research gives us one more support point suggesting that diet changes, such as including cherries, could potentially lower heart disease risk."

Researchers said the animal study is encouraging and will lead to further clinical studies in humans to explore the link between diet, weight, inflammation and lowering heart disease risk.

Tart cherries, often sold as dried, frozen or juice, contain powerful antioxidants known as anthocyanins. In addition to providing the fruit with its rich red color, studies suggest these plant compounds may be responsible for the fruit's health benefits.

More information

The National Cancer Institute has more about the health benefits of antioxidants.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Cherry Marketing Institute, news release, Oct. 26, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 26, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com