ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
CAREGIVING
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Eating your way to Good Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FITNESS
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Add your Article

Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats

SUNDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Call it the "tart heart-smart diet."

New research ties eating tart cherries to lowering cholesterol, reducing inflammation and cutting one's body weight and fat -- all major risk factors for heart disease.

This latest study, scheduled to be presented by University of Michigan researchers at the American Dietetic Association annual meeting, in Chicago, reached these conclusions after feeding whole tart cherry powder to obese rats.

After 12 weeks, the rats had 14 percent less body fat while maintaining lean muscle mass, compared to other rats who ate the same foods minus the cherry powder. The rats eating cherries also lost significant amounts of body weight -- notably a loss of "belly" fat, a known risk for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association.

The rats eating a cherry-enriched diet also dropped their total cholesterol levels by about 11 percent. Levels of two known markers of inflammation linked to increased risk for heart disease also dropped by 31 percent to 40 percent.

"Heart disease is the number one killer of Americans today, so it's important we continue researching ways people can improve their diet to help reduce key risk factors," study co-author Dr. Steven F. Bolling, a cardiac surgeon at the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, said in a news release from the study's sponsor, the Cherry Marketing Institute. "We know excess body fat increases the risk for heart disease. This research gives us one more support point suggesting that diet changes, such as including cherries, could potentially lower heart disease risk."

Researchers said the animal study is encouraging and will lead to further clinical studies in humans to explore the link between diet, weight, inflammation and lowering heart disease risk.

Tart cherries, often sold as dried, frozen or juice, contain powerful antioxidants known as anthocyanins. In addition to providing the fruit with its rich red color, studies suggest these plant compounds may be responsible for the fruit's health benefits.

More information

The National Cancer Institute has more about the health benefits of antioxidants.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Cherry Marketing Institute, news release, Oct. 26, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 26, 2008

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