ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Add your Article

Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats

SUNDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Call it the "tart heart-smart diet."

New research ties eating tart cherries to lowering cholesterol, reducing inflammation and cutting one's body weight and fat -- all major risk factors for heart disease.

This latest study, scheduled to be presented by University of Michigan researchers at the American Dietetic Association annual meeting, in Chicago, reached these conclusions after feeding whole tart cherry powder to obese rats.

After 12 weeks, the rats had 14 percent less body fat while maintaining lean muscle mass, compared to other rats who ate the same foods minus the cherry powder. The rats eating cherries also lost significant amounts of body weight -- notably a loss of "belly" fat, a known risk for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association.

The rats eating a cherry-enriched diet also dropped their total cholesterol levels by about 11 percent. Levels of two known markers of inflammation linked to increased risk for heart disease also dropped by 31 percent to 40 percent.

"Heart disease is the number one killer of Americans today, so it's important we continue researching ways people can improve their diet to help reduce key risk factors," study co-author Dr. Steven F. Bolling, a cardiac surgeon at the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, said in a news release from the study's sponsor, the Cherry Marketing Institute. "We know excess body fat increases the risk for heart disease. This research gives us one more support point suggesting that diet changes, such as including cherries, could potentially lower heart disease risk."

Researchers said the animal study is encouraging and will lead to further clinical studies in humans to explore the link between diet, weight, inflammation and lowering heart disease risk.

Tart cherries, often sold as dried, frozen or juice, contain powerful antioxidants known as anthocyanins. In addition to providing the fruit with its rich red color, studies suggest these plant compounds may be responsible for the fruit's health benefits.

More information

The National Cancer Institute has more about the health benefits of antioxidants.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Cherry Marketing Institute, news release, Oct. 26, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 26, 2008

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