ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Herb Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthriti
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
10 Beginner Tips for Fast Weight Loss, the Low-Carb Way!
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Add your Article

Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats

SUNDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Call it the "tart heart-smart diet."

New research ties eating tart cherries to lowering cholesterol, reducing inflammation and cutting one's body weight and fat -- all major risk factors for heart disease.

This latest study, scheduled to be presented by University of Michigan researchers at the American Dietetic Association annual meeting, in Chicago, reached these conclusions after feeding whole tart cherry powder to obese rats.

After 12 weeks, the rats had 14 percent less body fat while maintaining lean muscle mass, compared to other rats who ate the same foods minus the cherry powder. The rats eating cherries also lost significant amounts of body weight -- notably a loss of "belly" fat, a known risk for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association.

The rats eating a cherry-enriched diet also dropped their total cholesterol levels by about 11 percent. Levels of two known markers of inflammation linked to increased risk for heart disease also dropped by 31 percent to 40 percent.

"Heart disease is the number one killer of Americans today, so it's important we continue researching ways people can improve their diet to help reduce key risk factors," study co-author Dr. Steven F. Bolling, a cardiac surgeon at the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, said in a news release from the study's sponsor, the Cherry Marketing Institute. "We know excess body fat increases the risk for heart disease. This research gives us one more support point suggesting that diet changes, such as including cherries, could potentially lower heart disease risk."

Researchers said the animal study is encouraging and will lead to further clinical studies in humans to explore the link between diet, weight, inflammation and lowering heart disease risk.

Tart cherries, often sold as dried, frozen or juice, contain powerful antioxidants known as anthocyanins. In addition to providing the fruit with its rich red color, studies suggest these plant compounds may be responsible for the fruit's health benefits.

More information

The National Cancer Institute has more about the health benefits of antioxidants.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Cherry Marketing Institute, news release, Oct. 26, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 26, 2008

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