ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Eating Free Range
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Short-Term Air Pollution Exposure May Damage DNA
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
EYE CARE, VISION
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On

THURSDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Having two or more servings of dairy products a day starting as a preschooler may lead to better bone health as an adolescent, a new report says.

The study, expected to be published in The Journal of Pediatrics, found higher levels of bone mineral content and bone density in teens who consumed dairy at least twice a day since the ages of 3 to 5. These adolescents' average bone mineral content was 175 grams higher than adolescents who had consumed less than two dairy servings a day, even after researchers adjusted the results for factors that affect normal bone development, such as the child's growth, body size, and activity level.

The study highlights the significant role dairy plays in childhood as "a key source of proteins, calcium, and other micronutrients including phosphorus and vitamin D," study researcher Lynn Moore, of Boston University School of Medicine, said in a news release issued by the journal.

The researchers also found that children who combined their 2 or more servings of dairy with 4 ounces of meat or other nondairy protein during a day had bone mineral contents more than 300 grams higher than those children with lower intakes of both dairy and other proteins.

The findings come from analyzing data and family food diaries from the Framingham Children's Study, which gathered information from 106 children, 3 to 5 years of age at the beginning of the study, over a 12-year period. Information from the U.S. Department of Agriculture was also used to determine the children's average daily intake of dairy and other foods.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about bone health.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: The Journal of Pediatrics, news release, Aug. 13, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 14, 2008

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