ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
CANCER
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons

MONDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Add increased suffering for people with ragweed allergies to the list of problems caused by climate change, a new study suggests.

Recent research indicates that increasing global temperatures and carbon dioxide levels are causing longer ragweed seasons and more concentrated pollen counts, says the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, which has devoted the September issue of its Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology to examining the effects of climate change on allergic disease.

In one of the articles, Dr. Richard W. Weber, chairman of the AAAAI Aerobiology Committee, wrote that "there is now a wealth of evidence that climate change has had, and will have, further impact on a variety of allergenic plants."

Climate change has been linked to "longer pollen seasons, greater exposure and increased disease burden for late summer weeds such as ragweed," Weber noted. Researchers have found that increased carbon dioxide has boosted pollen production by 61 percent to 90 percent in some types of ragweed.

Ragweed pollen grains can travel up to 400 miles with the breeze, which means there is virtually no outdoor location that is free of ragweed pollen.

Allergy shots (immunotherapy) provide effective treatment for 90 percent of people with ragweed allergies, according to the AAAAI, which offered a number of simple steps that can help prevent or relieve ragweed allergy symptoms:

* Keep windows closed in your home and car. Use the air conditioner, which filters, cools and dries air.
* Stay indoors when pollen counts are highest, typically between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
* Check daily pollen counts for your area.
* After you spend time outside, change your clothes. Don't dry laundry outside.
* Take a shower before bed to wash pollen from your hair and face. Otherwise, the pollen could end up on your pillow.

More information

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology has more about allergies.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, news release, Aug. 5, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 25, 2008

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