ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
High Birth Weight Doubles Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons

MONDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Add increased suffering for people with ragweed allergies to the list of problems caused by climate change, a new study suggests.

Recent research indicates that increasing global temperatures and carbon dioxide levels are causing longer ragweed seasons and more concentrated pollen counts, says the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, which has devoted the September issue of its Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology to examining the effects of climate change on allergic disease.

In one of the articles, Dr. Richard W. Weber, chairman of the AAAAI Aerobiology Committee, wrote that "there is now a wealth of evidence that climate change has had, and will have, further impact on a variety of allergenic plants."

Climate change has been linked to "longer pollen seasons, greater exposure and increased disease burden for late summer weeds such as ragweed," Weber noted. Researchers have found that increased carbon dioxide has boosted pollen production by 61 percent to 90 percent in some types of ragweed.

Ragweed pollen grains can travel up to 400 miles with the breeze, which means there is virtually no outdoor location that is free of ragweed pollen.

Allergy shots (immunotherapy) provide effective treatment for 90 percent of people with ragweed allergies, according to the AAAAI, which offered a number of simple steps that can help prevent or relieve ragweed allergy symptoms:

* Keep windows closed in your home and car. Use the air conditioner, which filters, cools and dries air.
* Stay indoors when pollen counts are highest, typically between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
* Check daily pollen counts for your area.
* After you spend time outside, change your clothes. Don't dry laundry outside.
* Take a shower before bed to wash pollen from your hair and face. Otherwise, the pollen could end up on your pillow.

More information

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology has more about allergies.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, news release, Aug. 5, 2008

Last Updated: Aug. 25, 2008

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