ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
CANCER
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
CAREGIVING
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Database Helps Assess Your Breast Cancer Risk
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Add your Article

Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer

By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) - Good news for coffee lovers: Drinking up to six cups a day of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee daily won't shorten your life span, a new study shows.

In fact, coffee might even help the heart, especially for women, the researchers found.

"Our results suggest that long-term, regular coffee consumption does not increase the risk of death and probably has several beneficial effects on health," said lead researcher Dr. Esther Lopez-Garcia, assistant professor of preventive medicine at the Autonoma University in Madrid, Spain.

Her team published its findings in the June 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Lopez-Garcia stressed that the findings may only hold true only for healthy folk. "People with any disease or condition should ask their doctor about their risk, because caffeine still has an acute effect on short-term increase of blood pressure," she said.

In the study, the Spanish team looked at the relationships between coffee drinking and the risks of dying from heart disease, cancer, or any cause in almost 42,000 men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and more than 84,000 women who had participated in the Nurses' Health Study. At the study start, all participants were free of heart disease and cancer.

The participants completed questionnaires every two to four years, including information about their coffee drinking, other dietary habits, smoking and health conditions. The research team looked at the frequency of death from any cause, death due to heart disease, and death due to cancer among people with different coffee-drinking habits, comparing them to those who didn't drink the brew. They also controlled for other risk factors, including diet, smoking and body size.

The researchers found that women who drank two or three cups of caffeinated coffee daily had a 25 percent lower risk of death from heart disease during the follow-up (from 1980 to 2004) than non-drinkers. Women also had an 18 percent lower death risk from a cause other than cancer or heart disease compared with non-coffee drinkers.

For men, drinking two to three cups of caffeinated coffee daily was a "wash" -- not associated with either an increased or a decreased risk of death during the follow up, from 1986 to 2004.

The lower death rate was mainly due to a lower risk for heart disease deaths, the researchers found, while no link was discovered for coffee drinking and cancer deaths. The relationship did not seem to be directly related to caffeine, according to the researchers, since those who drank decaf also had a lower death rate than those who didn't drink either kind of coffee.

In the past, studies have come up with mixed results on the health effects of coffee, with some finding coffee increased the risk of death and others not.

More recently, research has found coffee drinking linked with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes and some cancers, and preventing the development of cardiovascular disease, Lopez-Garcia said.

The strength of her current study, she said, includes the large number of participants and long follow-up period.

While the study is interesting, it does have its shortcomings, said Dr. Peter Galier, an internal medicine specialist, former chief of staff at Santa Monica UCLA and Orthopedic Hospital and associate professor of medicine at the University of California Los Angeles' David Geffen School of Medicine.

Self-reporting is one shortcoming, he said, because people may have under- or over-reported their coffee consumption, for instance.

"I think what this study tells us is not so much that coffee is the answer to everything," he said. But, rather, that some compounds, such as the antioxidants found in coffee, may be healthy.

Galier's advice for consumers: "I would tell them to weigh the subjective risk of their coffee consumption," he said. For instance, "if they love coffee, but it makes them jittery, and they can't sleep, the need to adjust it," he said. "Look at your symptoms," he tells patients. "If decaf is no problem, I wouldn't put a limit on that."

The research was funded by grants from the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

More information

There's more on coffee at the American Dietetic Association.



SOURCES: Esther Lopez-Garcia, Ph.D., assistant professor of preventive medicine, Autonoma University of Madrid, Spain; Peter Galier, M.D., internal medicine specialist and former chief of staff, Santa Monica UCLA and Orthopaedic Hospital, Santa Monica, Calif., and associate professor of medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; June 17, 2008 Annals of Internal Medicine

Last Updated: June 16, 2008

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