ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
CAREGIVING
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Functional Foods Uncovered
Fruit Even Healthier Than Thought: Study Shows
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Run for Your Life
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Multivitamins Might Prolong Life
Can You Talk Your Way to Happy?
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer

By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) - Good news for coffee lovers: Drinking up to six cups a day of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee daily won't shorten your life span, a new study shows.

In fact, coffee might even help the heart, especially for women, the researchers found.

"Our results suggest that long-term, regular coffee consumption does not increase the risk of death and probably has several beneficial effects on health," said lead researcher Dr. Esther Lopez-Garcia, assistant professor of preventive medicine at the Autonoma University in Madrid, Spain.

Her team published its findings in the June 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Lopez-Garcia stressed that the findings may only hold true only for healthy folk. "People with any disease or condition should ask their doctor about their risk, because caffeine still has an acute effect on short-term increase of blood pressure," she said.

In the study, the Spanish team looked at the relationships between coffee drinking and the risks of dying from heart disease, cancer, or any cause in almost 42,000 men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and more than 84,000 women who had participated in the Nurses' Health Study. At the study start, all participants were free of heart disease and cancer.

The participants completed questionnaires every two to four years, including information about their coffee drinking, other dietary habits, smoking and health conditions. The research team looked at the frequency of death from any cause, death due to heart disease, and death due to cancer among people with different coffee-drinking habits, comparing them to those who didn't drink the brew. They also controlled for other risk factors, including diet, smoking and body size.

The researchers found that women who drank two or three cups of caffeinated coffee daily had a 25 percent lower risk of death from heart disease during the follow-up (from 1980 to 2004) than non-drinkers. Women also had an 18 percent lower death risk from a cause other than cancer or heart disease compared with non-coffee drinkers.

For men, drinking two to three cups of caffeinated coffee daily was a "wash" -- not associated with either an increased or a decreased risk of death during the follow up, from 1986 to 2004.

The lower death rate was mainly due to a lower risk for heart disease deaths, the researchers found, while no link was discovered for coffee drinking and cancer deaths. The relationship did not seem to be directly related to caffeine, according to the researchers, since those who drank decaf also had a lower death rate than those who didn't drink either kind of coffee.

In the past, studies have come up with mixed results on the health effects of coffee, with some finding coffee increased the risk of death and others not.

More recently, research has found coffee drinking linked with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes and some cancers, and preventing the development of cardiovascular disease, Lopez-Garcia said.

The strength of her current study, she said, includes the large number of participants and long follow-up period.

While the study is interesting, it does have its shortcomings, said Dr. Peter Galier, an internal medicine specialist, former chief of staff at Santa Monica UCLA and Orthopedic Hospital and associate professor of medicine at the University of California Los Angeles' David Geffen School of Medicine.

Self-reporting is one shortcoming, he said, because people may have under- or over-reported their coffee consumption, for instance.

"I think what this study tells us is not so much that coffee is the answer to everything," he said. But, rather, that some compounds, such as the antioxidants found in coffee, may be healthy.

Galier's advice for consumers: "I would tell them to weigh the subjective risk of their coffee consumption," he said. For instance, "if they love coffee, but it makes them jittery, and they can't sleep, the need to adjust it," he said. "Look at your symptoms," he tells patients. "If decaf is no problem, I wouldn't put a limit on that."

The research was funded by grants from the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

More information

There's more on coffee at the American Dietetic Association.



SOURCES: Esther Lopez-Garcia, Ph.D., assistant professor of preventive medicine, Autonoma University of Madrid, Spain; Peter Galier, M.D., internal medicine specialist and former chief of staff, Santa Monica UCLA and Orthopaedic Hospital, Santa Monica, Calif., and associate professor of medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; June 17, 2008 Annals of Internal Medicine

Last Updated: June 16, 2008

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