ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
CANCER
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Add your Article

Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk

By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Here's some good news for java junkies and tea lovers alike: Two new studies suggest that both beverages may lower your stroke risk.

As coffee drinking increases, the prevalence of stroke decreases, said Dr. David Liebeskind, author of the coffee study and an associate clinical professor of neurology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

He evaluated the association between coffee drinking and stroke by looking at data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, taken in 1988-94. He zeroed in on the 9,384 adults older than 40 who were coffee drinkers. Of those, 500 (5 percent) had been told by their doctor that they'd had a stroke. And 2,793 (29.8 percent) had self-reported stroke symptoms or a mini-stroke, also known as a transient ischemic attack.

When he looked at stroke prevalence and coffee drinking, Liebeskind found that the more coffee the adults drank, the less likely they were to have a stroke or a mini-stroke. Those who drank six or more cups a day, he found, had a stroke prevalence of 2.9 percent, whereas those who drank just one or two cups daily had a stroke prevalence of 5 percent.

The finding was presented Thursday at the International Stroke Conference in San Diego.

This latest coffee study comes on the heels of a study published in the February issue of Circulation that found long-term coffee consumption is linked with a lower stroke risk in women who don't smoke. To come to that conclusion, researchers followed more than 83,000 women who enrolled in the study in 1980 with no history of stroke, heart disease, diabetes or cancer.

They found stroke risk was 20 percent lower in those drinking four or more cups a day and 12 percent lower in those who had coffee five to seven times a week.

Tea drinkers may have reason to enjoy their brew, too, according to another study presented at the San Diego meeting.

Those who drink more than three cups a day had a 21 percent lower risk of stroke than those who sipped less than a cup daily, said study author Dr. Lenore Arab, a professor of medicine and biological chemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles.

She conducted a meta-analysis, pooling the results of nine published studies involving 4,378 strokes among more than 194,000 people, many from Asia. Black tea and green tea were studied, and it was typically caffeinated.

The result was that increased tea consumption decreased the risk. "We see it consistently in every study," Arab said. The research was funded by the Unilever Lipton Institute of Tea, a research and development arm of Lipton Tea.

Exactly how tea reduces stroke risk isn't clear, she said. Among the suggested ways it might work is by anti-inflammatory action. An amino acid found in black and green tea, theanine, may protect the brain.

The tea study is stronger than the coffee study, said Dr. Ralph Sacco, chairman of the department of neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

The coffee study, though interesting, "still needs confirmation," he said. The research was like a snapshot in time, asking people about coffee habits at a given point.

Better, he said, is to do a study in which participants are followed over time to determine if there is a link between coffee drinking and stroke.

He also wondered if coffee drinking might have decreased among those who were diagnosed with heart or other problems and were advised to reduce their coffee intake. "I don't feel this study is strong enough to recommend people drink coffee to reduce the risk of stroke," he said.

More information

To learn more about reducing the risk of stroke, visit the American Stroke Association.



SOURCES: Lenore Arab, Ph.D., professor, medicine and biological chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles; Ralph L. Sacco, M.D., chairman, department of neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and spokesman, American Stroke Association; Feb. 19, 2009, presentations, International Stroke Conference, San Diego

Last Updated: Feb. 20, 2009

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