ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
CANCER
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
FITNESS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
The Unmedicated Mind
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Add your Article

Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk

By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Here's some good news for java junkies and tea lovers alike: Two new studies suggest that both beverages may lower your stroke risk.

As coffee drinking increases, the prevalence of stroke decreases, said Dr. David Liebeskind, author of the coffee study and an associate clinical professor of neurology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

He evaluated the association between coffee drinking and stroke by looking at data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, taken in 1988-94. He zeroed in on the 9,384 adults older than 40 who were coffee drinkers. Of those, 500 (5 percent) had been told by their doctor that they'd had a stroke. And 2,793 (29.8 percent) had self-reported stroke symptoms or a mini-stroke, also known as a transient ischemic attack.

When he looked at stroke prevalence and coffee drinking, Liebeskind found that the more coffee the adults drank, the less likely they were to have a stroke or a mini-stroke. Those who drank six or more cups a day, he found, had a stroke prevalence of 2.9 percent, whereas those who drank just one or two cups daily had a stroke prevalence of 5 percent.

The finding was presented Thursday at the International Stroke Conference in San Diego.

This latest coffee study comes on the heels of a study published in the February issue of Circulation that found long-term coffee consumption is linked with a lower stroke risk in women who don't smoke. To come to that conclusion, researchers followed more than 83,000 women who enrolled in the study in 1980 with no history of stroke, heart disease, diabetes or cancer.

They found stroke risk was 20 percent lower in those drinking four or more cups a day and 12 percent lower in those who had coffee five to seven times a week.

Tea drinkers may have reason to enjoy their brew, too, according to another study presented at the San Diego meeting.

Those who drink more than three cups a day had a 21 percent lower risk of stroke than those who sipped less than a cup daily, said study author Dr. Lenore Arab, a professor of medicine and biological chemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles.

She conducted a meta-analysis, pooling the results of nine published studies involving 4,378 strokes among more than 194,000 people, many from Asia. Black tea and green tea were studied, and it was typically caffeinated.

The result was that increased tea consumption decreased the risk. "We see it consistently in every study," Arab said. The research was funded by the Unilever Lipton Institute of Tea, a research and development arm of Lipton Tea.

Exactly how tea reduces stroke risk isn't clear, she said. Among the suggested ways it might work is by anti-inflammatory action. An amino acid found in black and green tea, theanine, may protect the brain.

The tea study is stronger than the coffee study, said Dr. Ralph Sacco, chairman of the department of neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

The coffee study, though interesting, "still needs confirmation," he said. The research was like a snapshot in time, asking people about coffee habits at a given point.

Better, he said, is to do a study in which participants are followed over time to determine if there is a link between coffee drinking and stroke.

He also wondered if coffee drinking might have decreased among those who were diagnosed with heart or other problems and were advised to reduce their coffee intake. "I don't feel this study is strong enough to recommend people drink coffee to reduce the risk of stroke," he said.

More information

To learn more about reducing the risk of stroke, visit the American Stroke Association.



SOURCES: Lenore Arab, Ph.D., professor, medicine and biological chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles; Ralph L. Sacco, M.D., chairman, department of neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and spokesman, American Stroke Association; Feb. 19, 2009, presentations, International Stroke Conference, San Diego

Last Updated: Feb. 20, 2009

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