ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
CANCER
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Eating Less May Slow Aging Process
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Maximize Your Run
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids

The pesticide chlorpyrifos is associated with delays in the physical and mental development of young children, a new study shows.

The product is banned in U.S. households but is widely used as an agricultural pesticide on fruits and vegetables. The agricultural use of chlorpyrifos is currently under review by the Environmental Protection Agency.

This study included 266 children in low-income areas of the South Bronx and Northern Manhattan in New York City. Chlorpyrifos was commonly used in these neighborhoods until it was banned for household use in 2001.

The researchers found that a high level of exposure to the pesticide (greater than 6.17 pg/g in umbilical cord blood at the time of birth) was associated with a 6.5-point decrease in the Psychomotor Development Index score and a 3.3-point decrease in the Mental Development Index score in 3-year-old children.

The study was published online March 18 in advance of print publication in the May issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

"This study helps to fill in the gaps about what is known about the effect of the pesticide chlorpyrifos on the development of young children by showing that there is a clear-cut association between this chemical and delayed mental and motor skill development in children even when there are other potentially harmful environmental factors present," lead author Gina Lovasi, of Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, said in a news release.

"Although this pesticide has been banned for residential use in the United States, chlorpyrifos and other organophosphorus insecticides are still commonly used for a variety of agricultural purposes, study co-author Virginia Rauh, co-deputy director for the Columbia Center for Childrens Environmental Health, said in the news release. "We hope that the results of this study, further demonstrating the neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos under a range of community conditions, may inform public health professionals and policy-makers about the potential hazards of exposure to this chemical for pregnant women and young children."

More information

The U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has more about chlorpyrifos.


SOURCES: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, news release, March 18, 2010 Published on: March 19, 2010