ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
FITNESS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Maximize Your Run
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
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Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids

The pesticide chlorpyrifos is associated with delays in the physical and mental development of young children, a new study shows.

The product is banned in U.S. households but is widely used as an agricultural pesticide on fruits and vegetables. The agricultural use of chlorpyrifos is currently under review by the Environmental Protection Agency.

This study included 266 children in low-income areas of the South Bronx and Northern Manhattan in New York City. Chlorpyrifos was commonly used in these neighborhoods until it was banned for household use in 2001.

The researchers found that a high level of exposure to the pesticide (greater than 6.17 pg/g in umbilical cord blood at the time of birth) was associated with a 6.5-point decrease in the Psychomotor Development Index score and a 3.3-point decrease in the Mental Development Index score in 3-year-old children.

The study was published online March 18 in advance of print publication in the May issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

"This study helps to fill in the gaps about what is known about the effect of the pesticide chlorpyrifos on the development of young children by showing that there is a clear-cut association between this chemical and delayed mental and motor skill development in children even when there are other potentially harmful environmental factors present," lead author Gina Lovasi, of Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, said in a news release.

"Although this pesticide has been banned for residential use in the United States, chlorpyrifos and other organophosphorus insecticides are still commonly used for a variety of agricultural purposes, study co-author Virginia Rauh, co-deputy director for the Columbia Center for Childrens Environmental Health, said in the news release. "We hope that the results of this study, further demonstrating the neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos under a range of community conditions, may inform public health professionals and policy-makers about the potential hazards of exposure to this chemical for pregnant women and young children."

More information

The U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has more about chlorpyrifos.


SOURCES: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, news release, March 18, 2010 Published on: March 19, 2010